Iodine release from high-burnup fuel structures: Separate-effect tests and simulated fuel pellets for better understanding of iodine behaviour in nuclear fuels

Janne Heikinheimo (Corresponding Author), Teemu Kärkelä, Václav Tyrpekl, Matĕj̆ Niz̆n̆anský, Mélany Gouëllo, Unto Tapper

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Abstract

Abstract: Iodine release modelling of nuclear fuel pellets has major uncertainties that restrict applications in current fuel performance codes. The uncertainties origin from both the chemical behaviour of iodine in the fuel pellet and the release of different chemical species. The structure of nuclear fuel pellet evolves due to neutron and fission product irradiation, thermo-mechanical loads and fission product chemical interactions. This causes extra challenges for the fuel behaviour modelling. After sufficient amount of irradiation, a new type of structure starts forming at the cylindrical pellet outer edge. The porous structure is called high-burnup structure or rim structure. The effects of high-burnup structure on fuel behaviour become more pronounced with increasing burnup. As the phenomena in the nuclear fuel pellet are diverse, experiments with simulated fuel pellets can help in understanding and limiting the problem at hand. As fission gas or iodine release behaviour from high-burnup structure is not fully understood, the current preliminary study focuses on (i) sintering of porous fuel samples with Cs and I, (ii) measurements of released species during the annealing experiments and (iii) interpretation of the iodine release results with the scope of current fission gas release models. Graphical abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Original languageEnglish
JournalMRS Advances
Early online date8 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Dec 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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