Method for estimation of pumonary capillary pressure during intensive care

Juha Pärkkä, Ilkka Korhonen, Esko Ruokonen, Jukka Takala

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientific

Abstract

Pulmonary capillary pressure (Pcap) is a major factor of pulmonary ederna. Pcap would be valuable information, e.g., when assessing effects of a therapy on a critically ill patient. Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), central venous pressure (CVP) and pressure in the Swan-Canz catheter balloon were measured during pulmonary arterial occlusion procedure. An automatic method was developed to detect the instant of occlusion, to cancel the ventilation artefact and to compute the Pcap. Catheter balloon pressure was used to detect the instant of occlusion. Ventilation artefact was removed by applying adaptive filtering to PAP signal. CVP was used as the reference signal for the adaptive filter. Pcap was estimated using single exponential fit method.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation 1999
Place of PublicationChicago
Pages276-279
Publication statusPublished - 1999
MoE publication typeB3 Non-refereed article in conference proceedings
Event3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation, BSI 1999 - Chicago, United States
Duration: 12 Jun 199914 Jun 1999

Conference

Conference3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation, BSI 1999
Abbreviated titleBSi 1999
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period12/06/9914/06/99

Fingerprint

Critical Care
Pressure
Lung
Central Venous Pressure
Artifacts
Ventilation
Arterial Pressure
Catheters
Critical Illness

Cite this

Pärkkä, J., Korhonen, I., Ruokonen, E., & Takala, J. (1999). Method for estimation of pumonary capillary pressure during intensive care. In Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation 1999 (pp. 276-279). Chicago.
Pärkkä, Juha ; Korhonen, Ilkka ; Ruokonen, Esko ; Takala, Jukka. / Method for estimation of pumonary capillary pressure during intensive care. Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation 1999. Chicago, 1999. pp. 276-279
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Pärkkä, J, Korhonen, I, Ruokonen, E & Takala, J 1999, Method for estimation of pumonary capillary pressure during intensive care. in Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation 1999. Chicago, pp. 276-279, 3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation, BSI 1999, Chicago, United States, 12/06/99.

Method for estimation of pumonary capillary pressure during intensive care. / Pärkkä, Juha; Korhonen, Ilkka; Ruokonen, Esko; Takala, Jukka.

Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation 1999. Chicago, 1999. p. 276-279.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientific

TY - GEN

T1 - Method for estimation of pumonary capillary pressure during intensive care

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AU - Korhonen, Ilkka

AU - Ruokonen, Esko

AU - Takala, Jukka

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N2 - Pulmonary capillary pressure (Pcap) is a major factor of pulmonary ederna. Pcap would be valuable information, e.g., when assessing effects of a therapy on a critically ill patient. Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), central venous pressure (CVP) and pressure in the Swan-Canz catheter balloon were measured during pulmonary arterial occlusion procedure. An automatic method was developed to detect the instant of occlusion, to cancel the ventilation artefact and to compute the Pcap. Catheter balloon pressure was used to detect the instant of occlusion. Ventilation artefact was removed by applying adaptive filtering to PAP signal. CVP was used as the reference signal for the adaptive filter. Pcap was estimated using single exponential fit method.

AB - Pulmonary capillary pressure (Pcap) is a major factor of pulmonary ederna. Pcap would be valuable information, e.g., when assessing effects of a therapy on a critically ill patient. Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), central venous pressure (CVP) and pressure in the Swan-Canz catheter balloon were measured during pulmonary arterial occlusion procedure. An automatic method was developed to detect the instant of occlusion, to cancel the ventilation artefact and to compute the Pcap. Catheter balloon pressure was used to detect the instant of occlusion. Ventilation artefact was removed by applying adaptive filtering to PAP signal. CVP was used as the reference signal for the adaptive filter. Pcap was estimated using single exponential fit method.

M3 - Conference article in proceedings

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BT - Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation 1999

CY - Chicago

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Pärkkä J, Korhonen I, Ruokonen E, Takala J. Method for estimation of pumonary capillary pressure during intensive care. In Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation 1999. Chicago. 1999. p. 276-279