Modeling the spectral signature of forests

Application of remote sensing models to coniferous canopies

Pauline Stenberg, Matti Mõttus, Miina Rautiainen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The vertical and horizontal structure of forest canopies is one of the most important driving factors of various ecosystem processes and has received increasing attention during the past 20 years and served as an impetus for earth observation missions. In the remote sensing community, the variables which describe canopy structure are called biophysical variables, and are directly coupled with the fundamental physical problem behind remote sensing: radiative transfer in vegetation. There are basically three different approaches to interpreting biophysical variables from remotely sensed data: (1) empirical, (2) physically based, and (3) various combinations of them. The physical approach builds upon an understanding of the physical laws governing the transfer of solar radiation in vegetative canopies, and formulates it mathematically by canopy reflectance models which relate the spectral signal to biophysical properties of the vegetation. In this chapter, we will first outline the basic principles and existing physically based model types for simulating the spectral signature of forests. After this, the focus is on the specific issues related to applying these models to the complex 3D structure of coniferous canopies.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Land Remote Sensing
Subtitle of host publicationSystem, Modeling, Inversion and Application
Pages147-171
Number of pages25
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2008
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
Event2005 9th International Symposium on Physical Measurements and Signatures in Remote Sensing - Beijing, China
Duration: 1 Oct 20051 Oct 2005

Conference

Conference2005 9th International Symposium on Physical Measurements and Signatures in Remote Sensing
CountryChina
CityBeijing
Period1/10/051/10/05

Fingerprint

Remote sensing
Radiative transfer
Solar radiation
Ecosystems
Earth (planet)

Cite this

Stenberg, P., Mõttus, M., & Rautiainen, M. (2008). Modeling the spectral signature of forests: Application of remote sensing models to coniferous canopies. In Advances in Land Remote Sensing: System, Modeling, Inversion and Application (pp. 147-171)
Stenberg, Pauline ; Mõttus, Matti ; Rautiainen, Miina. / Modeling the spectral signature of forests : Application of remote sensing models to coniferous canopies. Advances in Land Remote Sensing: System, Modeling, Inversion and Application. 2008. pp. 147-171
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Stenberg, P, Mõttus, M & Rautiainen, M 2008, Modeling the spectral signature of forests: Application of remote sensing models to coniferous canopies. in Advances in Land Remote Sensing: System, Modeling, Inversion and Application. pp. 147-171, 2005 9th International Symposium on Physical Measurements and Signatures in Remote Sensing, Beijing, China, 1/10/05.

Modeling the spectral signature of forests : Application of remote sensing models to coniferous canopies. / Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina.

Advances in Land Remote Sensing: System, Modeling, Inversion and Application. 2008. p. 147-171.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

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Stenberg P, Mõttus M, Rautiainen M. Modeling the spectral signature of forests: Application of remote sensing models to coniferous canopies. In Advances in Land Remote Sensing: System, Modeling, Inversion and Application. 2008. p. 147-171