N100 auditory potential and electroencephalogram discriminate propofol induced sedation levels

Heidi Yppärilä, Ilkka Korhonen, Mika Tarvainen, Tadeusz Musialowicz, Jakob Stephan, Juhani Partanen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. In the present study, we evaluated the electroencephalogram (EEG) and auditory N100 potential (N100) before and during propofol-induced sedation. The aim was to test whether using EEG and N100 the level of sedation may be evaluated.

Methods. Twenty-nine cardiac surgery patients were studied. The EEG signal and the N100 potential were recorded at awake one day before the cardiac operation and two times after the operation, when the clinical level of postoperative propofol sedation was considered deep (Ramsay Score 6) and moderate (Ramsay Score 4). Discriminant analysis was used to select those spectral EEG and/or N100 variables which would predict the correct level of sedation best. The final classification was based on canonical discriminant functions and Mahalanobis' distance.

Results. The spectral EEG variables (slow/fast-ratio, delta, and beta2 powers) predicted the correct level of sedation with 81% (canonical discriminant functions) and 80% (Mahalanobis' distance) accuracy. Similarly, the N100 (amplitude, latency, and the first principal component) predicted the correct level of sedation with 91% and 92% accuracy, and the combination of the EEG and N100 with 96% and 93% accuracy.

Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the combined use of EEG and N100 may help to differentiate the propofol-induced sedation levels, and thus be a useful compliment to clinical sedation scales.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163 - 170
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Propofol
Electroencephalography
Discriminant Analysis
Thoracic Surgery

Keywords

  • electroencephalogram
  • auditory evoked potentials
  • sedation
  • principal component analysis
  • canonical discrimination function
  • Mahalanobis' distance

Cite this

Yppärilä, Heidi ; Korhonen, Ilkka ; Tarvainen, Mika ; Musialowicz, Tadeusz ; Stephan, Jakob ; Partanen, Juhani. / N100 auditory potential and electroencephalogram discriminate propofol induced sedation levels. In: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing. 2004 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 163 - 170.
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title = "N100 auditory potential and electroencephalogram discriminate propofol induced sedation levels",
abstract = "Objective. In the present study, we evaluated the electroencephalogram (EEG) and auditory N100 potential (N100) before and during propofol-induced sedation. The aim was to test whether using EEG and N100 the level of sedation may be evaluated.Methods. Twenty-nine cardiac surgery patients were studied. The EEG signal and the N100 potential were recorded at awake one day before the cardiac operation and two times after the operation, when the clinical level of postoperative propofol sedation was considered deep (Ramsay Score 6) and moderate (Ramsay Score 4). Discriminant analysis was used to select those spectral EEG and/or N100 variables which would predict the correct level of sedation best. The final classification was based on canonical discriminant functions and Mahalanobis' distance.Results. The spectral EEG variables (slow/fast-ratio, delta, and beta2 powers) predicted the correct level of sedation with 81{\%} (canonical discriminant functions) and 80{\%} (Mahalanobis' distance) accuracy. Similarly, the N100 (amplitude, latency, and the first principal component) predicted the correct level of sedation with 91{\%} and 92{\%} accuracy, and the combination of the EEG and N100 with 96{\%} and 93{\%} accuracy.Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the combined use of EEG and N100 may help to differentiate the propofol-induced sedation levels, and thus be a useful compliment to clinical sedation scales.",
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Yppärilä, H, Korhonen, I, Tarvainen, M, Musialowicz, T, Stephan, J & Partanen, J 2004, 'N100 auditory potential and electroencephalogram discriminate propofol induced sedation levels', Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 163 - 170. https://doi.org/10.1023/B:JOCM.0000042921.47988.bf

N100 auditory potential and electroencephalogram discriminate propofol induced sedation levels. / Yppärilä, Heidi; Korhonen, Ilkka; Tarvainen, Mika; Musialowicz, Tadeusz; Stephan, Jakob; Partanen, Juhani.

In: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2004, p. 163 - 170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - N100 auditory potential and electroencephalogram discriminate propofol induced sedation levels

AU - Yppärilä, Heidi

AU - Korhonen, Ilkka

AU - Tarvainen, Mika

AU - Musialowicz, Tadeusz

AU - Stephan, Jakob

AU - Partanen, Juhani

N1 - Project code: T3SU00087

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Objective. In the present study, we evaluated the electroencephalogram (EEG) and auditory N100 potential (N100) before and during propofol-induced sedation. The aim was to test whether using EEG and N100 the level of sedation may be evaluated.Methods. Twenty-nine cardiac surgery patients were studied. The EEG signal and the N100 potential were recorded at awake one day before the cardiac operation and two times after the operation, when the clinical level of postoperative propofol sedation was considered deep (Ramsay Score 6) and moderate (Ramsay Score 4). Discriminant analysis was used to select those spectral EEG and/or N100 variables which would predict the correct level of sedation best. The final classification was based on canonical discriminant functions and Mahalanobis' distance.Results. The spectral EEG variables (slow/fast-ratio, delta, and beta2 powers) predicted the correct level of sedation with 81% (canonical discriminant functions) and 80% (Mahalanobis' distance) accuracy. Similarly, the N100 (amplitude, latency, and the first principal component) predicted the correct level of sedation with 91% and 92% accuracy, and the combination of the EEG and N100 with 96% and 93% accuracy.Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the combined use of EEG and N100 may help to differentiate the propofol-induced sedation levels, and thus be a useful compliment to clinical sedation scales.

AB - Objective. In the present study, we evaluated the electroencephalogram (EEG) and auditory N100 potential (N100) before and during propofol-induced sedation. The aim was to test whether using EEG and N100 the level of sedation may be evaluated.Methods. Twenty-nine cardiac surgery patients were studied. The EEG signal and the N100 potential were recorded at awake one day before the cardiac operation and two times after the operation, when the clinical level of postoperative propofol sedation was considered deep (Ramsay Score 6) and moderate (Ramsay Score 4). Discriminant analysis was used to select those spectral EEG and/or N100 variables which would predict the correct level of sedation best. The final classification was based on canonical discriminant functions and Mahalanobis' distance.Results. The spectral EEG variables (slow/fast-ratio, delta, and beta2 powers) predicted the correct level of sedation with 81% (canonical discriminant functions) and 80% (Mahalanobis' distance) accuracy. Similarly, the N100 (amplitude, latency, and the first principal component) predicted the correct level of sedation with 91% and 92% accuracy, and the combination of the EEG and N100 with 96% and 93% accuracy.Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the combined use of EEG and N100 may help to differentiate the propofol-induced sedation levels, and thus be a useful compliment to clinical sedation scales.

KW - electroencephalogram

KW - auditory evoked potentials

KW - sedation

KW - principal component analysis

KW - canonical discrimination function

KW - Mahalanobis' distance

U2 - 10.1023/B:JOCM.0000042921.47988.bf

DO - 10.1023/B:JOCM.0000042921.47988.bf

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 163

EP - 170

JO - Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing

JF - Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing

SN - 1387-1307

IS - 3

ER -