Nanotechnologies in food packaging

Maria Smolander, Qasim Chaudhry

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter or book articleProfessional

Abstract

The main function of food packaging is to protect and preserve the food, to maintain its quality and safety, and to reduce food waste. Other desirable attributes have come to the fore recently including packaging that is sustainable with a low environmental footprint, is “active” and/or is “intelligent.” As materials and applications of nanotechnologies can help meet these requirements, they are rapidly becoming a commercial reality in the area of food packaging. Example applications include the enhancement of mechanical properties to allow development of further light-weight materials, and using nanocomposites or nanocoatings to improve barrier properties. An especially interesting area of application is using nanotechnology products to increase the performance of some biobased and biodegradable materials so that they can be used for a wider range of food applications and not only dry foods. There are also a number of products under development for active packaging – which can release or absorb chemicals – or as intelligent (smart) packaging materials that incorporate nano-sensors. Consequently, nanotechnology products and applications could revolutionise some areas of the food packaging sector, providing innovative, sustainable, strong, lightweight and active and intelligent materials. Market uptake will however be impeded by any uncertainties on consumer and environmental safety. Based on theoretical considerations, and the results of limited testing that has been carried out so far, the expectation is that due to the fixed or embedded nature of nanomaterials in plastics, they are not likely to pose a significant risk to the consumer. However, further research addressing the safety issues of nanotechnologies is needed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNanotechnologies in Food
EditorsQasim Chauldhry, Laurence Castle, Richard Watkins
Place of PublicationCambridge, UK
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry RSC
Chapter6
Pages86-101
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-84755-988-3
ISBN (Print)978-0-85404-169-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
MoE publication typeD2 Article in professional manuals or guides or professional information systems or text book material

Publication series

NameNanoscience & Nanotechnology
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry (RSC)

Fingerprint

nanotechnology
food packaging
packaging
nanocomposites
ecological footprint
nanomaterials
food waste
biodegradability
packaging materials
mechanical properties
preserves
uncertainty
plastics
markets
testing

Cite this

Smolander, M., & Chaudhry, Q. (2010). Nanotechnologies in food packaging. In Q. Chauldhry, L. Castle, & R. Watkins (Eds.), Nanotechnologies in Food (pp. 86-101). Cambridge, UK: Royal Society of Chemistry RSC. Nanoscience & Nanotechnology https://doi.org/10.1039/9781847559883-00086
Smolander, Maria ; Chaudhry, Qasim. / Nanotechnologies in food packaging. Nanotechnologies in Food. editor / Qasim Chauldhry ; Laurence Castle ; Richard Watkins. Cambridge, UK : Royal Society of Chemistry RSC, 2010. pp. 86-101 (Nanoscience & Nanotechnology).
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Smolander, M & Chaudhry, Q 2010, Nanotechnologies in food packaging. in Q Chauldhry, L Castle & R Watkins (eds), Nanotechnologies in Food. Royal Society of Chemistry RSC, Cambridge, UK, Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, pp. 86-101. https://doi.org/10.1039/9781847559883-00086

Nanotechnologies in food packaging. / Smolander, Maria; Chaudhry, Qasim.

Nanotechnologies in Food. ed. / Qasim Chauldhry; Laurence Castle; Richard Watkins. Cambridge, UK : Royal Society of Chemistry RSC, 2010. p. 86-101 (Nanoscience & Nanotechnology).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter or book articleProfessional

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AB - The main function of food packaging is to protect and preserve the food, to maintain its quality and safety, and to reduce food waste. Other desirable attributes have come to the fore recently including packaging that is sustainable with a low environmental footprint, is “active” and/or is “intelligent.” As materials and applications of nanotechnologies can help meet these requirements, they are rapidly becoming a commercial reality in the area of food packaging. Example applications include the enhancement of mechanical properties to allow development of further light-weight materials, and using nanocomposites or nanocoatings to improve barrier properties. An especially interesting area of application is using nanotechnology products to increase the performance of some biobased and biodegradable materials so that they can be used for a wider range of food applications and not only dry foods. There are also a number of products under development for active packaging – which can release or absorb chemicals – or as intelligent (smart) packaging materials that incorporate nano-sensors. Consequently, nanotechnology products and applications could revolutionise some areas of the food packaging sector, providing innovative, sustainable, strong, lightweight and active and intelligent materials. Market uptake will however be impeded by any uncertainties on consumer and environmental safety. Based on theoretical considerations, and the results of limited testing that has been carried out so far, the expectation is that due to the fixed or embedded nature of nanomaterials in plastics, they are not likely to pose a significant risk to the consumer. However, further research addressing the safety issues of nanotechnologies is needed.

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Smolander M, Chaudhry Q. Nanotechnologies in food packaging. In Chauldhry Q, Castle L, Watkins R, editors, Nanotechnologies in Food. Cambridge, UK: Royal Society of Chemistry RSC. 2010. p. 86-101. (Nanoscience & Nanotechnology). https://doi.org/10.1039/9781847559883-00086