Nickel-based HVOF coatings promoting high temperature corrosion resistance of biomass-fired power plant boilers

Maria Oksa (Corresponding Author), Pertti Auerkari, Jorma Salonen, Tommi Varis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    32 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers in Europe, and the number is increasing due to actions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass boilers often experience strong corrosion due to harmful elements in fuels. In biomass burning, detrimental components include especially chlorine, potassium and heavy metals, which can cause chlorine-induced active oxidation or hot corrosion by molten phases even at fairly low temperatures. In order to increase the corrosion resistance of heat exchanger components, either more alloyed steels or protective coatings should be applied. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed coatings may provide corrosion protection for low alloy tube materials. Three nickel based thermal spray coatings (Ni–24Cr–16.5Mo, Ni–22Cr<5Fe–9Mo–4Nb and Ni–22Cr–10Al–1Y) were tested for two years in a 40 MW circulating fluidized boiler (CFB), which had experienced severe corrosion and a tube failure. The coated tubes were installed to the cold and the hot economizer. After the exposure the coatings and the substrate materials were analyzed with SEM–EDX. The uncoated boiler tubes corroded strongly, whereas the thermal spray coatings exhibited excellent corrosion performance. This paper presents the tube failure at the cold economizer, exposure conditions, the analysis of the coated and uncoated samples, and the corrosion mechanisms of the steel tubes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)236-245
    Number of pages10
    JournalFuel Processing Technology
    Volume125
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Fingerprint

    Nickel
    Boilers
    Corrosion resistance
    Power plants
    Biomass
    Corrosion
    Coatings
    Economizers
    Steel
    Chlorine
    Temperature
    Sprayed coatings
    Protective coatings
    Corrosion protection
    Heavy Metals
    Gas emissions
    Greenhouse gases
    Heavy metals
    Heat exchangers
    Potassium

    Keywords

    • Biomass combustion
    • chlorine induced corrosion
    • corrosion protection
    • high temperature corrosion
    • HVOF
    • thermal spray coating

    Cite this

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    title = "Nickel-based HVOF coatings promoting high temperature corrosion resistance of biomass-fired power plant boilers",
    abstract = "There are over 1000 biomass boilers in Europe, and the number is increasing due to actions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass boilers often experience strong corrosion due to harmful elements in fuels. In biomass burning, detrimental components include especially chlorine, potassium and heavy metals, which can cause chlorine-induced active oxidation or hot corrosion by molten phases even at fairly low temperatures. In order to increase the corrosion resistance of heat exchanger components, either more alloyed steels or protective coatings should be applied. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed coatings may provide corrosion protection for low alloy tube materials. Three nickel based thermal spray coatings (Ni–24Cr–16.5Mo, Ni–22Cr<5Fe–9Mo–4Nb and Ni–22Cr–10Al–1Y) were tested for two years in a 40 MW circulating fluidized boiler (CFB), which had experienced severe corrosion and a tube failure. The coated tubes were installed to the cold and the hot economizer. After the exposure the coatings and the substrate materials were analyzed with SEM–EDX. The uncoated boiler tubes corroded strongly, whereas the thermal spray coatings exhibited excellent corrosion performance. This paper presents the tube failure at the cold economizer, exposure conditions, the analysis of the coated and uncoated samples, and the corrosion mechanisms of the steel tubes.",
    keywords = "Biomass combustion, chlorine induced corrosion, corrosion protection, high temperature corrosion, HVOF, thermal spray coating",
    author = "Maria Oksa and Pertti Auerkari and Jorma Salonen and Tommi Varis",
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    Nickel-based HVOF coatings promoting high temperature corrosion resistance of biomass-fired power plant boilers. / Oksa, Maria (Corresponding Author); Auerkari, Pertti; Salonen, Jorma; Varis, Tommi.

    In: Fuel Processing Technology, Vol. 125, 2014, p. 236-245.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Nickel-based HVOF coatings promoting high temperature corrosion resistance of biomass-fired power plant boilers

    AU - Oksa, Maria

    AU - Auerkari, Pertti

    AU - Salonen, Jorma

    AU - Varis, Tommi

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - There are over 1000 biomass boilers in Europe, and the number is increasing due to actions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass boilers often experience strong corrosion due to harmful elements in fuels. In biomass burning, detrimental components include especially chlorine, potassium and heavy metals, which can cause chlorine-induced active oxidation or hot corrosion by molten phases even at fairly low temperatures. In order to increase the corrosion resistance of heat exchanger components, either more alloyed steels or protective coatings should be applied. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed coatings may provide corrosion protection for low alloy tube materials. Three nickel based thermal spray coatings (Ni–24Cr–16.5Mo, Ni–22Cr<5Fe–9Mo–4Nb and Ni–22Cr–10Al–1Y) were tested for two years in a 40 MW circulating fluidized boiler (CFB), which had experienced severe corrosion and a tube failure. The coated tubes were installed to the cold and the hot economizer. After the exposure the coatings and the substrate materials were analyzed with SEM–EDX. The uncoated boiler tubes corroded strongly, whereas the thermal spray coatings exhibited excellent corrosion performance. This paper presents the tube failure at the cold economizer, exposure conditions, the analysis of the coated and uncoated samples, and the corrosion mechanisms of the steel tubes.

    AB - There are over 1000 biomass boilers in Europe, and the number is increasing due to actions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass boilers often experience strong corrosion due to harmful elements in fuels. In biomass burning, detrimental components include especially chlorine, potassium and heavy metals, which can cause chlorine-induced active oxidation or hot corrosion by molten phases even at fairly low temperatures. In order to increase the corrosion resistance of heat exchanger components, either more alloyed steels or protective coatings should be applied. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed coatings may provide corrosion protection for low alloy tube materials. Three nickel based thermal spray coatings (Ni–24Cr–16.5Mo, Ni–22Cr<5Fe–9Mo–4Nb and Ni–22Cr–10Al–1Y) were tested for two years in a 40 MW circulating fluidized boiler (CFB), which had experienced severe corrosion and a tube failure. The coated tubes were installed to the cold and the hot economizer. After the exposure the coatings and the substrate materials were analyzed with SEM–EDX. The uncoated boiler tubes corroded strongly, whereas the thermal spray coatings exhibited excellent corrosion performance. This paper presents the tube failure at the cold economizer, exposure conditions, the analysis of the coated and uncoated samples, and the corrosion mechanisms of the steel tubes.

    KW - Biomass combustion

    KW - chlorine induced corrosion

    KW - corrosion protection

    KW - high temperature corrosion

    KW - HVOF

    KW - thermal spray coating

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    DO - 10.1016/j.fuproc.2014.04.006

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    JO - Fuel Processing Technology

    JF - Fuel Processing Technology

    SN - 0378-3820

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