Papermaking with enzymatically functionalised pulps

Anna Suurnäkki, Stina Grönqvist, Hannu Mikkonen, Elias Retulainen, Liisa Viikari

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsScientific

Abstract

The properties of fibre material used in papermaking are currently modified by different mechanical and chemical processing steps in the pulp mill. In the paper mill, various paper chemicals and papermaking process solutions are further used to design the quality of the paper product. An interesting option for fibre modification is the targeted functionalisation of fibre surfaces via enzymatic radicalisation by oxidative enzymes. In principle, cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin can be the target polymers through which the functional component can be bound to the fibre material. Currently, one of the most promising chemo-enzymatic methods is based on the use of lignin as bonding matrix for designed attachment of novel functional groups to pulp. By functionalisation the already existing valuable properties of fibres could be fortified. Functionalisation could also be used introduce entirely new properties to fibres, leading to various options for using wood fibres in completely new application areas. Combination of chemo-enzymatic functionalisation with papermaking chemistry could give benefits in papermaking prosessing. Therefore, the effects of functionalisation of mechanical pulps on fibre properties, papermaking chemistry and processing were investigated. Factors including pulp type, laccase origin and dosage affecting the functionalisation efficiency were also elucidated. Both inherent fibre properties, such as charge, and completely novel properties, such as hydrophobicity, could be brought to fibres by chemo-enzymatic functionalisation. In addition, promising results in papermaking properties of pulps were obtained when combining chemo-enzymatic functionalisation and papermaking chemistry.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication10th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry
Subtitle of host publicationBook of Abstracts: EnzMod 2.3
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Papermaking
Pulp
Fibers
Lignin
Mechanical pulp
Paper products
Laccase
Paper and pulp mills
Hydrophobicity
Processing
Cellulose
Functional groups
Wood
Polymers

Cite this

Suurnäkki, A., Grönqvist, S., Mikkonen, H., Retulainen, E., & Viikari, L. (2007). Papermaking with enzymatically functionalised pulps. In 10th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry: Book of Abstracts: EnzMod 2.3 [49]
Suurnäkki, Anna ; Grönqvist, Stina ; Mikkonen, Hannu ; Retulainen, Elias ; Viikari, Liisa. / Papermaking with enzymatically functionalised pulps. 10th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry: Book of Abstracts: EnzMod 2.3. 2007.
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Suurnäkki, A, Grönqvist, S, Mikkonen, H, Retulainen, E & Viikari, L 2007, Papermaking with enzymatically functionalised pulps. in 10th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry: Book of Abstracts: EnzMod 2.3., 49.

Papermaking with enzymatically functionalised pulps. / Suurnäkki, Anna; Grönqvist, Stina; Mikkonen, Hannu; Retulainen, Elias; Viikari, Liisa.

10th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry: Book of Abstracts: EnzMod 2.3. 2007. 49.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsScientific

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T1 - Papermaking with enzymatically functionalised pulps

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AU - Grönqvist, Stina

AU - Mikkonen, Hannu

AU - Retulainen, Elias

AU - Viikari, Liisa

PY - 2007

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N2 - The properties of fibre material used in papermaking are currently modified by different mechanical and chemical processing steps in the pulp mill. In the paper mill, various paper chemicals and papermaking process solutions are further used to design the quality of the paper product. An interesting option for fibre modification is the targeted functionalisation of fibre surfaces via enzymatic radicalisation by oxidative enzymes. In principle, cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin can be the target polymers through which the functional component can be bound to the fibre material. Currently, one of the most promising chemo-enzymatic methods is based on the use of lignin as bonding matrix for designed attachment of novel functional groups to pulp. By functionalisation the already existing valuable properties of fibres could be fortified. Functionalisation could also be used introduce entirely new properties to fibres, leading to various options for using wood fibres in completely new application areas. Combination of chemo-enzymatic functionalisation with papermaking chemistry could give benefits in papermaking prosessing. Therefore, the effects of functionalisation of mechanical pulps on fibre properties, papermaking chemistry and processing were investigated. Factors including pulp type, laccase origin and dosage affecting the functionalisation efficiency were also elucidated. Both inherent fibre properties, such as charge, and completely novel properties, such as hydrophobicity, could be brought to fibres by chemo-enzymatic functionalisation. In addition, promising results in papermaking properties of pulps were obtained when combining chemo-enzymatic functionalisation and papermaking chemistry.

AB - The properties of fibre material used in papermaking are currently modified by different mechanical and chemical processing steps in the pulp mill. In the paper mill, various paper chemicals and papermaking process solutions are further used to design the quality of the paper product. An interesting option for fibre modification is the targeted functionalisation of fibre surfaces via enzymatic radicalisation by oxidative enzymes. In principle, cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin can be the target polymers through which the functional component can be bound to the fibre material. Currently, one of the most promising chemo-enzymatic methods is based on the use of lignin as bonding matrix for designed attachment of novel functional groups to pulp. By functionalisation the already existing valuable properties of fibres could be fortified. Functionalisation could also be used introduce entirely new properties to fibres, leading to various options for using wood fibres in completely new application areas. Combination of chemo-enzymatic functionalisation with papermaking chemistry could give benefits in papermaking prosessing. Therefore, the effects of functionalisation of mechanical pulps on fibre properties, papermaking chemistry and processing were investigated. Factors including pulp type, laccase origin and dosage affecting the functionalisation efficiency were also elucidated. Both inherent fibre properties, such as charge, and completely novel properties, such as hydrophobicity, could be brought to fibres by chemo-enzymatic functionalisation. In addition, promising results in papermaking properties of pulps were obtained when combining chemo-enzymatic functionalisation and papermaking chemistry.

M3 - Conference abstract in proceedings

BT - 10th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry

ER -

Suurnäkki A, Grönqvist S, Mikkonen H, Retulainen E, Viikari L. Papermaking with enzymatically functionalised pulps. In 10th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry: Book of Abstracts: EnzMod 2.3. 2007. 49