Pilot-scale brewing using self-cloning bottom-fermenting yeast with high SSU1 expression

T. Ogata (Corresponding Author), M. Kobayashi, Brian Gibson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A pilot‐scale fermentation was performed using SSU1‐overexpressing bottom‐fermenting yeast strains constructed by ‘self‐cloning’. In these strains, the gene SSU1, encoding a plasma membrane protein that excretes sulphite, was highly expressed. The rate of fermentation of the two SSU1‐overexpressing strains tested showed some reduction during the mid‐fermentation phase as compared with the parental strain. These differences, however, did not affect overall fermentation and the final apparent extracts had decreased to a level normally obtained during brewing. The concentration of hydrogen sulphide in the wort remained low during fermentation in the case of the two self‐cloning strains compared with the parent. The concentration of 2‐mercapto‐3‐methyl‐1‐butanol, a sulphur compound that causes an ‘onion‐like’ off‐flavour, was also reduced in the case of the self‐cloning strains, a result confirmed by sensory evaluation of the beer immediately after bottling. Furthermore, with these strains the anti‐oxidation potential of bottled beer, as measured by electron spin resonance, was improved and the concentration of trans‐2‐nonenal in bottled beer after 7 days of accelerated aging at 37°C was decreased. These observations, together with the lower stale flavour score determined by sensory evaluation of bottled beer after a month of aging at 25°C, indicated that the flavour stability of the beer had been successfully improved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-22
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Institute of Brewing
Volume119
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

brewing
Organism Cloning
molecular cloning
Yeasts
Fermentation
beers
yeasts
fermentation
Sulfur Compounds
sensory evaluation
Hydrogen Sulfide
Sulfites
flavor
Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
bottling
wort (brewing)
Blood Proteins
Membrane Proteins
hydrogen sulfide
sulfites

Keywords

  • bottom-fermenting yeast
  • flavour stability
  • pilot scale brewing
  • self-cloning
  • SSU1
  • thiol off-flavour

Cite this

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title = "Pilot-scale brewing using self-cloning bottom-fermenting yeast with high SSU1 expression",
abstract = "A pilot‐scale fermentation was performed using SSU1‐overexpressing bottom‐fermenting yeast strains constructed by ‘self‐cloning’. In these strains, the gene SSU1, encoding a plasma membrane protein that excretes sulphite, was highly expressed. The rate of fermentation of the two SSU1‐overexpressing strains tested showed some reduction during the mid‐fermentation phase as compared with the parental strain. These differences, however, did not affect overall fermentation and the final apparent extracts had decreased to a level normally obtained during brewing. The concentration of hydrogen sulphide in the wort remained low during fermentation in the case of the two self‐cloning strains compared with the parent. The concentration of 2‐mercapto‐3‐methyl‐1‐butanol, a sulphur compound that causes an ‘onion‐like’ off‐flavour, was also reduced in the case of the self‐cloning strains, a result confirmed by sensory evaluation of the beer immediately after bottling. Furthermore, with these strains the anti‐oxidation potential of bottled beer, as measured by electron spin resonance, was improved and the concentration of trans‐2‐nonenal in bottled beer after 7 days of accelerated aging at 37°C was decreased. These observations, together with the lower stale flavour score determined by sensory evaluation of bottled beer after a month of aging at 25°C, indicated that the flavour stability of the beer had been successfully improved.",
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Pilot-scale brewing using self-cloning bottom-fermenting yeast with high SSU1 expression. / Ogata, T. (Corresponding Author); Kobayashi, M.; Gibson, Brian.

In: Journal of the Institute of Brewing, Vol. 119, No. 1-2, 2013, p. 17-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Kobayashi, M.

AU - Gibson, Brian

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N2 - A pilot‐scale fermentation was performed using SSU1‐overexpressing bottom‐fermenting yeast strains constructed by ‘self‐cloning’. In these strains, the gene SSU1, encoding a plasma membrane protein that excretes sulphite, was highly expressed. The rate of fermentation of the two SSU1‐overexpressing strains tested showed some reduction during the mid‐fermentation phase as compared with the parental strain. These differences, however, did not affect overall fermentation and the final apparent extracts had decreased to a level normally obtained during brewing. The concentration of hydrogen sulphide in the wort remained low during fermentation in the case of the two self‐cloning strains compared with the parent. The concentration of 2‐mercapto‐3‐methyl‐1‐butanol, a sulphur compound that causes an ‘onion‐like’ off‐flavour, was also reduced in the case of the self‐cloning strains, a result confirmed by sensory evaluation of the beer immediately after bottling. Furthermore, with these strains the anti‐oxidation potential of bottled beer, as measured by electron spin resonance, was improved and the concentration of trans‐2‐nonenal in bottled beer after 7 days of accelerated aging at 37°C was decreased. These observations, together with the lower stale flavour score determined by sensory evaluation of bottled beer after a month of aging at 25°C, indicated that the flavour stability of the beer had been successfully improved.

AB - A pilot‐scale fermentation was performed using SSU1‐overexpressing bottom‐fermenting yeast strains constructed by ‘self‐cloning’. In these strains, the gene SSU1, encoding a plasma membrane protein that excretes sulphite, was highly expressed. The rate of fermentation of the two SSU1‐overexpressing strains tested showed some reduction during the mid‐fermentation phase as compared with the parental strain. These differences, however, did not affect overall fermentation and the final apparent extracts had decreased to a level normally obtained during brewing. The concentration of hydrogen sulphide in the wort remained low during fermentation in the case of the two self‐cloning strains compared with the parent. The concentration of 2‐mercapto‐3‐methyl‐1‐butanol, a sulphur compound that causes an ‘onion‐like’ off‐flavour, was also reduced in the case of the self‐cloning strains, a result confirmed by sensory evaluation of the beer immediately after bottling. Furthermore, with these strains the anti‐oxidation potential of bottled beer, as measured by electron spin resonance, was improved and the concentration of trans‐2‐nonenal in bottled beer after 7 days of accelerated aging at 37°C was decreased. These observations, together with the lower stale flavour score determined by sensory evaluation of bottled beer after a month of aging at 25°C, indicated that the flavour stability of the beer had been successfully improved.

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