Pitching rate in high gravity brewing

Maija-Liisa Suihko, Arvi Vilpola, Matti Linko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The optimal pitching rate in high gravity worts (12–16°P) was about 0.3 g/l wet weight (2.3 × 106 counted cells/ml) and per one percent of original wort gravity. In very high gravity worts (20–23°P) the corresponding figure was 0.4 g/l (2.9 × 106 cells/ml). Higher amounts of yeast did not improve the fermentation rate.

With increased original wort gravity, flocculation of the yeast weakened and the amount of cropped yeast decreased. The viability of the crop yeast was good.

In the conditions used, excessive production of acetate esters occurred only with pitching rates lower than the recommended rate. As the original wort gravity increased, more fermentable extract was metabolized to ethanol rather than utilized for yeast growth. The highest ethanol yield obtained was 10.9% (v/v).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341 - 346
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Institute of Brewing
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Hypergravity
brewing
gravity
Yeasts
wort (brewing)
yeasts
Gravitation
Ethanol
ethanol
Flocculation
flocculation
Fermentation
Esters
Acetates
esters
acetates
fermentation
viability
cells
Weights and Measures

Cite this

Suihko, Maija-Liisa ; Vilpola, Arvi ; Linko, Matti. / Pitching rate in high gravity brewing. In: Journal of the Institute of Brewing. 1993 ; Vol. 99, No. 4. pp. 341 - 346.
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Pitching rate in high gravity brewing. / Suihko, Maija-Liisa; Vilpola, Arvi; Linko, Matti.

In: Journal of the Institute of Brewing, Vol. 99, No. 4, 1993, p. 341 - 346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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