Planck early results. XXI

Properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic plane

Jussi Tuovinen, Jussi Varis, D.J. Marshall (Corresponding Author), Planck Collaboration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Planck has observed the entire sky from 30 GHz to 857GHz. The observed foreground emission contains contributions from different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM). We have separated the observed Galactic emission into the different gaseous components (atomic, molecular and ionised) in each of a number of Galactocentric rings. This technique provides the necessary information to study dust properties (emissivity, temperature, etc.), as well as other emission mechanisms as a function of Galactic radius. Templates are created for various Galactocentric radii using velocity information from atomic (neutral hydrogen) and molecular (12CO) observations. The ionised template is assumed to be traced by free-free emission as observed by WMAP, while 408 MHz emission is used to trace the synchrotron component. Gas emission not traced by the above templates, namely “dark gas”, as evidenced using Planck data, is included as an additional template, the first time such a component has been used in this way. These templates are then correlated with each of the Planck frequency bands, as well as with higher frequency data from IRAS and DIRBE along with radio data at 1.4 GHz. The emission per column density of the gas templates allows us to create distinct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) per Galactocentric ring and in each of the gaseous tracers from 1.4 GHz to 25 THz (12μm). The resulting SEDs allow us to explore the contribution of various emission mechanisms to the Planck signal. Apart from the thermal dust and free-free emission, we have probed the Galaxy for anomalous (e.g., spinning) dust as well as synchrotron emission. We find the dust opacity in the solar neighbourhood, τ/NH = 0.92 ± 0.05 × 10-25   cm2 at 250 μm, with no significant variation with Galactic radius, even though the dust temperature is seen to vary from over 25 K to under 14 K. Furthermore, we show that anomalous dust emission is present in the atomic, molecular and dark gas phases throughout the Galactic disk. Anomalous emission is not clearly detected in the ionised phase, as free-free emission is seen to dominate. The derived dust propeties associated with the dark gas phase are derived but do not allow us to reveal the nature of this phase. For all environments, the anomalous emission is consistent with rotation from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and, according to our simple model, accounts for (25 ± 5)% (statistical) of the total emission at 30 GHz.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberA21
Number of pages18
JournalAstronomy and Astrophysics
Volume536
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

dust
templates
gas
spectral energy distribution
radii
synchrotrons
gases
vapor phases
solar neighborhood
monatomic gases
rings
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Infrared Astronomy Satellite
molecular gases
emissivity
opacity
metal spinning
tracers
energy
sky

Keywords

  • ISM: general
  • Galaxy: general
  • radio continuum: ISM
  • submillimeter: ISM
  • infrared: ISM
  • radiation mechanisms: general

Cite this

@article{23ebef2e9b8c49afbf32c558b6027f42,
title = "Planck early results. XXI: Properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic plane",
abstract = "Planck has observed the entire sky from 30 GHz to 857GHz. The observed foreground emission contains contributions from different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM). We have separated the observed Galactic emission into the different gaseous components (atomic, molecular and ionised) in each of a number of Galactocentric rings. This technique provides the necessary information to study dust properties (emissivity, temperature, etc.), as well as other emission mechanisms as a function of Galactic radius. Templates are created for various Galactocentric radii using velocity information from atomic (neutral hydrogen) and molecular (12CO) observations. The ionised template is assumed to be traced by free-free emission as observed by WMAP, while 408 MHz emission is used to trace the synchrotron component. Gas emission not traced by the above templates, namely “dark gas”, as evidenced using Planck data, is included as an additional template, the first time such a component has been used in this way. These templates are then correlated with each of the Planck frequency bands, as well as with higher frequency data from IRAS and DIRBE along with radio data at 1.4 GHz. The emission per column density of the gas templates allows us to create distinct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) per Galactocentric ring and in each of the gaseous tracers from 1.4 GHz to 25 THz (12μm). The resulting SEDs allow us to explore the contribution of various emission mechanisms to the Planck signal. Apart from the thermal dust and free-free emission, we have probed the Galaxy for anomalous (e.g., spinning) dust as well as synchrotron emission. We find the dust opacity in the solar neighbourhood, τ/NH = 0.92 ± 0.05 × 10-25   cm2 at 250 μm, with no significant variation with Galactic radius, even though the dust temperature is seen to vary from over 25 K to under 14 K. Furthermore, we show that anomalous dust emission is present in the atomic, molecular and dark gas phases throughout the Galactic disk. Anomalous emission is not clearly detected in the ionised phase, as free-free emission is seen to dominate. The derived dust propeties associated with the dark gas phase are derived but do not allow us to reveal the nature of this phase. For all environments, the anomalous emission is consistent with rotation from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and, according to our simple model, accounts for (25 ± 5){\%} (statistical) of the total emission at 30 GHz.",
keywords = "ISM: general, Galaxy: general, radio continuum: ISM, submillimeter: ISM, infrared: ISM, radiation mechanisms: general",
author = "A. Abergel and P.A.R. Ade and N. Aghanim and Jussi Tuovinen and Jussi Varis and D.J. Marshall and {Planck Collaboration}",
note = "Project code: 18080",
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language = "English",
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journal = "Astronomy and Astrophysics",
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}

Planck early results. XXI : Properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic plane. / Tuovinen, Jussi; Varis, Jussi; Marshall, D.J. (Corresponding Author); Planck Collaboration.

In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, Vol. 536, A21, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Planck early results. XXI

T2 - Properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic plane

AU - Abergel, A.

AU - Ade, P.A.R.

AU - Aghanim, N.

AU - Tuovinen, Jussi

AU - Varis, Jussi

AU - Marshall, D.J.

AU - Planck Collaboration

N1 - Project code: 18080

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Planck has observed the entire sky from 30 GHz to 857GHz. The observed foreground emission contains contributions from different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM). We have separated the observed Galactic emission into the different gaseous components (atomic, molecular and ionised) in each of a number of Galactocentric rings. This technique provides the necessary information to study dust properties (emissivity, temperature, etc.), as well as other emission mechanisms as a function of Galactic radius. Templates are created for various Galactocentric radii using velocity information from atomic (neutral hydrogen) and molecular (12CO) observations. The ionised template is assumed to be traced by free-free emission as observed by WMAP, while 408 MHz emission is used to trace the synchrotron component. Gas emission not traced by the above templates, namely “dark gas”, as evidenced using Planck data, is included as an additional template, the first time such a component has been used in this way. These templates are then correlated with each of the Planck frequency bands, as well as with higher frequency data from IRAS and DIRBE along with radio data at 1.4 GHz. The emission per column density of the gas templates allows us to create distinct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) per Galactocentric ring and in each of the gaseous tracers from 1.4 GHz to 25 THz (12μm). The resulting SEDs allow us to explore the contribution of various emission mechanisms to the Planck signal. Apart from the thermal dust and free-free emission, we have probed the Galaxy for anomalous (e.g., spinning) dust as well as synchrotron emission. We find the dust opacity in the solar neighbourhood, τ/NH = 0.92 ± 0.05 × 10-25   cm2 at 250 μm, with no significant variation with Galactic radius, even though the dust temperature is seen to vary from over 25 K to under 14 K. Furthermore, we show that anomalous dust emission is present in the atomic, molecular and dark gas phases throughout the Galactic disk. Anomalous emission is not clearly detected in the ionised phase, as free-free emission is seen to dominate. The derived dust propeties associated with the dark gas phase are derived but do not allow us to reveal the nature of this phase. For all environments, the anomalous emission is consistent with rotation from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and, according to our simple model, accounts for (25 ± 5)% (statistical) of the total emission at 30 GHz.

AB - Planck has observed the entire sky from 30 GHz to 857GHz. The observed foreground emission contains contributions from different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM). We have separated the observed Galactic emission into the different gaseous components (atomic, molecular and ionised) in each of a number of Galactocentric rings. This technique provides the necessary information to study dust properties (emissivity, temperature, etc.), as well as other emission mechanisms as a function of Galactic radius. Templates are created for various Galactocentric radii using velocity information from atomic (neutral hydrogen) and molecular (12CO) observations. The ionised template is assumed to be traced by free-free emission as observed by WMAP, while 408 MHz emission is used to trace the synchrotron component. Gas emission not traced by the above templates, namely “dark gas”, as evidenced using Planck data, is included as an additional template, the first time such a component has been used in this way. These templates are then correlated with each of the Planck frequency bands, as well as with higher frequency data from IRAS and DIRBE along with radio data at 1.4 GHz. The emission per column density of the gas templates allows us to create distinct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) per Galactocentric ring and in each of the gaseous tracers from 1.4 GHz to 25 THz (12μm). The resulting SEDs allow us to explore the contribution of various emission mechanisms to the Planck signal. Apart from the thermal dust and free-free emission, we have probed the Galaxy for anomalous (e.g., spinning) dust as well as synchrotron emission. We find the dust opacity in the solar neighbourhood, τ/NH = 0.92 ± 0.05 × 10-25   cm2 at 250 μm, with no significant variation with Galactic radius, even though the dust temperature is seen to vary from over 25 K to under 14 K. Furthermore, we show that anomalous dust emission is present in the atomic, molecular and dark gas phases throughout the Galactic disk. Anomalous emission is not clearly detected in the ionised phase, as free-free emission is seen to dominate. The derived dust propeties associated with the dark gas phase are derived but do not allow us to reveal the nature of this phase. For all environments, the anomalous emission is consistent with rotation from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and, according to our simple model, accounts for (25 ± 5)% (statistical) of the total emission at 30 GHz.

KW - ISM: general

KW - Galaxy: general

KW - radio continuum: ISM

KW - submillimeter: ISM

KW - infrared: ISM

KW - radiation mechanisms: general

U2 - 10.1051/0004-6361/201116455

DO - 10.1051/0004-6361/201116455

M3 - Article

VL - 536

JO - Astronomy and Astrophysics

JF - Astronomy and Astrophysics

SN - 0004-6361

M1 - A21

ER -