Plant-based solutions for veterinary immunotherapeutics and prophylactics

I. Kolotilin, E. Topp, E. Cox, B. Devriendt, U. Conrad, Jussi Joensuu, E. Stäger, H. Warzecha, T. McAllister, A. Potter, M. McLean, C. Hall, R. Menassa (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An alarming increase in emergence of antibiotic resistance among pathogens worldwide has become a serious threat to our ability to treat infectious diseases according to the World Health Organization. Extensive use of antibiotics by livestock producers promotes the spread of new resistant strains, some of zoonotic concern, which increases food-borne illness in humans and causes significant economic burden on healthcare systems. Furthermore, consumer preferences for meat/poultry/fish produced without the use of antibiotics shape today’s market demand. So, it is viewed as inevitable by the One Health Initiative that humans need to reduce the use of antibiotics and turn to alternative, improved means to control disease: vaccination and prophylactics. Besides the intense research focused on novel therapeutic molecules, both these strategies rely heavily on the availability of cost-effective, efficient and scalable production platforms which will allow large-volume manufacturing for vaccines, antibodies and other biopharmaceuticals. Within this context, plant-based platforms for production of recombinant therapeutic proteins offer significant advantages over conventional expression systems, including lack of animal pathogens, low production costs, fast turnaround and response times and rapid, nearly-unlimited scalability. Also, because dried leaves and seeds can be stored at room temperature for lengthy periods without loss of recombinant proteins, plant expression systems have the potential to offer lucrative benefits from the development of edible vaccines and prophylactics, as these would not require “cold chain” storage and transportation, and could be administered in mass volumes with minimal processing. Several biotechnology companies currently have developed and adopted plant-based platforms for commercial production of recombinant protein therapeutics. In this manuscript, we outline the challenges in the process of livestock immunization as well as the current plant biotechnology developments aimed to address these challenges.
Original languageEnglish
JournalVeterinary Research
Volume45
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Recombinant Proteins
Livestock
Biotechnology
Anti-Bacterial Agents
biopharmaceuticals
Edible Vaccines
antibiotics
recombinant proteins
biotechnology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Refrigeration
Aptitude
Foodborne Diseases
Plant Development
livestock
edible vaccines
Cotyledon
Zoonoses
Poultry
Microbial Drug Resistance

Cite this

Kolotilin, I. ; Topp, E. ; Cox, E. ; Devriendt, B. ; Conrad, U. ; Joensuu, Jussi ; Stäger, E. ; Warzecha, H. ; McAllister, T. ; Potter, A. ; McLean, M. ; Hall, C. ; Menassa, R. / Plant-based solutions for veterinary immunotherapeutics and prophylactics. In: Veterinary Research. 2014 ; Vol. 45.
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abstract = "An alarming increase in emergence of antibiotic resistance among pathogens worldwide has become a serious threat to our ability to treat infectious diseases according to the World Health Organization. Extensive use of antibiotics by livestock producers promotes the spread of new resistant strains, some of zoonotic concern, which increases food-borne illness in humans and causes significant economic burden on healthcare systems. Furthermore, consumer preferences for meat/poultry/fish produced without the use of antibiotics shape today’s market demand. So, it is viewed as inevitable by the One Health Initiative that humans need to reduce the use of antibiotics and turn to alternative, improved means to control disease: vaccination and prophylactics. Besides the intense research focused on novel therapeutic molecules, both these strategies rely heavily on the availability of cost-effective, efficient and scalable production platforms which will allow large-volume manufacturing for vaccines, antibodies and other biopharmaceuticals. Within this context, plant-based platforms for production of recombinant therapeutic proteins offer significant advantages over conventional expression systems, including lack of animal pathogens, low production costs, fast turnaround and response times and rapid, nearly-unlimited scalability. Also, because dried leaves and seeds can be stored at room temperature for lengthy periods without loss of recombinant proteins, plant expression systems have the potential to offer lucrative benefits from the development of edible vaccines and prophylactics, as these would not require “cold chain” storage and transportation, and could be administered in mass volumes with minimal processing. Several biotechnology companies currently have developed and adopted plant-based platforms for commercial production of recombinant protein therapeutics. In this manuscript, we outline the challenges in the process of livestock immunization as well as the current plant biotechnology developments aimed to address these challenges.",
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Kolotilin, I, Topp, E, Cox, E, Devriendt, B, Conrad, U, Joensuu, J, Stäger, E, Warzecha, H, McAllister, T, Potter, A, McLean, M, Hall, C & Menassa, R 2014, 'Plant-based solutions for veterinary immunotherapeutics and prophylactics', Veterinary Research, vol. 45. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-014-0117-4

Plant-based solutions for veterinary immunotherapeutics and prophylactics. / Kolotilin, I.; Topp, E.; Cox, E.; Devriendt, B.; Conrad, U.; Joensuu, Jussi; Stäger, E.; Warzecha, H.; McAllister, T.; Potter, A.; McLean, M.; Hall, C.; Menassa, R. (Corresponding Author).

In: Veterinary Research, Vol. 45, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Topp, E.

AU - Cox, E.

AU - Devriendt, B.

AU - Conrad, U.

AU - Joensuu, Jussi

AU - Stäger, E.

AU - Warzecha, H.

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AU - Potter, A.

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AU - Hall, C.

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AB - An alarming increase in emergence of antibiotic resistance among pathogens worldwide has become a serious threat to our ability to treat infectious diseases according to the World Health Organization. Extensive use of antibiotics by livestock producers promotes the spread of new resistant strains, some of zoonotic concern, which increases food-borne illness in humans and causes significant economic burden on healthcare systems. Furthermore, consumer preferences for meat/poultry/fish produced without the use of antibiotics shape today’s market demand. So, it is viewed as inevitable by the One Health Initiative that humans need to reduce the use of antibiotics and turn to alternative, improved means to control disease: vaccination and prophylactics. Besides the intense research focused on novel therapeutic molecules, both these strategies rely heavily on the availability of cost-effective, efficient and scalable production platforms which will allow large-volume manufacturing for vaccines, antibodies and other biopharmaceuticals. Within this context, plant-based platforms for production of recombinant therapeutic proteins offer significant advantages over conventional expression systems, including lack of animal pathogens, low production costs, fast turnaround and response times and rapid, nearly-unlimited scalability. Also, because dried leaves and seeds can be stored at room temperature for lengthy periods without loss of recombinant proteins, plant expression systems have the potential to offer lucrative benefits from the development of edible vaccines and prophylactics, as these would not require “cold chain” storage and transportation, and could be administered in mass volumes with minimal processing. Several biotechnology companies currently have developed and adopted plant-based platforms for commercial production of recombinant protein therapeutics. In this manuscript, we outline the challenges in the process of livestock immunization as well as the current plant biotechnology developments aimed to address these challenges.

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DO - 10.1186/s13567-014-0117-4

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JF - Veterinary Research

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