Postural sway and steppingn response among working population: Reproducibility, long-term stability, and associations with symptoms of the low-back

Esa-Pekka Takala, Ilkka Korhonen, Eira Viikari-Juntura

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Abstract

Objective. To investigate the day-to-day reproducibility and long-term (9 months) stability of variables of postural control, and the associations of these variables with low-back and lower-extremity pain in a working population.

Design. Test-retest measurements of 18 healthy subjects. Cross-sectional study of 165 working women and 343 men.

Background. Sudden loss of postural balance may result in microtraumas of back structures. Therefore workers with decreased postural control may run an increased risk of low-back pain. There are few reports describing the reproducibility of force-plate-based posturography.

Methods. Amplitude and velocity of postural sway were measured with a force-plate in a two-feet stance with eyes open and closed, and in a one-foot stance with eyes open. A stepping response test was developed to measure the dynamic components of balance.

Results. The mean differences between the repeated measurements were generally 5–10% and the standard deviations of these differences were up to a quarter or one third of the mean measurement values. Sway velocity showed the best overall reproducibility. Men had a larger sway than women independent of age and anthropometry. The group of non-symptomatic subjects showed wide variation and a slightly lower sway than the groups with low-back or lower-extremity pain.

Conclusions. Postural sway has moderate stability, wide variation, and slight associations with low-back symptoms in a working population.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-437
JournalClinical Biomechanics
Volume12
Issue number7-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Lower Extremity
Postural Balance
Working Women
Pain
Anthropometry
Low Back Pain
Population
Healthy Volunteers
Cross-Sectional Studies

Cite this

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title = "Postural sway and steppingn response among working population: Reproducibility, long-term stability, and associations with symptoms of the low-back",
abstract = "Objective. To investigate the day-to-day reproducibility and long-term (9 months) stability of variables of postural control, and the associations of these variables with low-back and lower-extremity pain in a working population.Design. Test-retest measurements of 18 healthy subjects. Cross-sectional study of 165 working women and 343 men.Background. Sudden loss of postural balance may result in microtraumas of back structures. Therefore workers with decreased postural control may run an increased risk of low-back pain. There are few reports describing the reproducibility of force-plate-based posturography.Methods. Amplitude and velocity of postural sway were measured with a force-plate in a two-feet stance with eyes open and closed, and in a one-foot stance with eyes open. A stepping response test was developed to measure the dynamic components of balance.Results. The mean differences between the repeated measurements were generally 5–10{\%} and the standard deviations of these differences were up to a quarter or one third of the mean measurement values. Sway velocity showed the best overall reproducibility. Men had a larger sway than women independent of age and anthropometry. The group of non-symptomatic subjects showed wide variation and a slightly lower sway than the groups with low-back or lower-extremity pain.Conclusions. Postural sway has moderate stability, wide variation, and slight associations with low-back symptoms in a working population.",
author = "Esa-Pekka Takala and Ilkka Korhonen and Eira Viikari-Juntura",
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Postural sway and steppingn response among working population : Reproducibility, long-term stability, and associations with symptoms of the low-back. / Takala, Esa-Pekka; Korhonen, Ilkka; Viikari-Juntura, Eira.

In: Clinical Biomechanics, Vol. 12, No. 7-8, 1997, p. 429-437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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N2 - Objective. To investigate the day-to-day reproducibility and long-term (9 months) stability of variables of postural control, and the associations of these variables with low-back and lower-extremity pain in a working population.Design. Test-retest measurements of 18 healthy subjects. Cross-sectional study of 165 working women and 343 men.Background. Sudden loss of postural balance may result in microtraumas of back structures. Therefore workers with decreased postural control may run an increased risk of low-back pain. There are few reports describing the reproducibility of force-plate-based posturography.Methods. Amplitude and velocity of postural sway were measured with a force-plate in a two-feet stance with eyes open and closed, and in a one-foot stance with eyes open. A stepping response test was developed to measure the dynamic components of balance.Results. The mean differences between the repeated measurements were generally 5–10% and the standard deviations of these differences were up to a quarter or one third of the mean measurement values. Sway velocity showed the best overall reproducibility. Men had a larger sway than women independent of age and anthropometry. The group of non-symptomatic subjects showed wide variation and a slightly lower sway than the groups with low-back or lower-extremity pain.Conclusions. Postural sway has moderate stability, wide variation, and slight associations with low-back symptoms in a working population.

AB - Objective. To investigate the day-to-day reproducibility and long-term (9 months) stability of variables of postural control, and the associations of these variables with low-back and lower-extremity pain in a working population.Design. Test-retest measurements of 18 healthy subjects. Cross-sectional study of 165 working women and 343 men.Background. Sudden loss of postural balance may result in microtraumas of back structures. Therefore workers with decreased postural control may run an increased risk of low-back pain. There are few reports describing the reproducibility of force-plate-based posturography.Methods. Amplitude and velocity of postural sway were measured with a force-plate in a two-feet stance with eyes open and closed, and in a one-foot stance with eyes open. A stepping response test was developed to measure the dynamic components of balance.Results. The mean differences between the repeated measurements were generally 5–10% and the standard deviations of these differences were up to a quarter or one third of the mean measurement values. Sway velocity showed the best overall reproducibility. Men had a larger sway than women independent of age and anthropometry. The group of non-symptomatic subjects showed wide variation and a slightly lower sway than the groups with low-back or lower-extremity pain.Conclusions. Postural sway has moderate stability, wide variation, and slight associations with low-back symptoms in a working population.

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