Potential of Bacillus cereus for producing an emetic toxin, cereulide, in bakery products

Quantitative analysis by chemical and biological methods

Elina Jääskeläinen (Corresponding Author), Max Häggblom, Maria Andersson, Liisa Vanne, Mirja Salkinoja-Salonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A method for the direct quantitative analysis of cereulide, the emetic toxin of Bacillus cereus, in bakery products was developed. The analysis was based on robotized extraction followed by quantitation of cereulide by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and an assay of toxicity by the boar sperm motility inhibition test. The bioassay and the chemical assay gave comparable results, demonstrating that the extracted cereulide was in a biologically active form. Cereulide was formed when cereulide-producing B. cereus strains were present at > or = 106 CFU/g in products with water activity values of > 0.953 and pHs of > 5.6. Rice-containing pastries accumulated high contents of cereulide (0.3 to 5.5 microg/g [wet weight]) when stored at nonrefrigeration temperatures (21 to 23 degrees C). Cereulide was not formed in products stored at refrigeration temperatures (4 to 8 degrees C). Cereulide is not inactivated by heating during food processing. Therefore, direct analysis of this toxin in food is preferable to cultivating methods for assessing the risk of food poisoning by emetic B. cereus.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1047-1054
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Food Protection
Volume66
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

emetics
Emetics
baked goods
Bacillus cereus
quantitative analysis
toxins
pastries
stored products
assays
foodborne illness
refrigeration
sperm motility
boars
food processing
water activity
liquid chromatography
temperature
bioassays
methodology
mass spectrometry

Cite this

Jääskeläinen, Elina ; Häggblom, Max ; Andersson, Maria ; Vanne, Liisa ; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja. / Potential of Bacillus cereus for producing an emetic toxin, cereulide, in bakery products : Quantitative analysis by chemical and biological methods. In: Journal of Food Protection. 2003 ; Vol. 66, No. 6. pp. 1047-1054.
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abstract = "A method for the direct quantitative analysis of cereulide, the emetic toxin of Bacillus cereus, in bakery products was developed. The analysis was based on robotized extraction followed by quantitation of cereulide by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and an assay of toxicity by the boar sperm motility inhibition test. The bioassay and the chemical assay gave comparable results, demonstrating that the extracted cereulide was in a biologically active form. Cereulide was formed when cereulide-producing B. cereus strains were present at > or = 106 CFU/g in products with water activity values of > 0.953 and pHs of > 5.6. Rice-containing pastries accumulated high contents of cereulide (0.3 to 5.5 microg/g [wet weight]) when stored at nonrefrigeration temperatures (21 to 23 degrees C). Cereulide was not formed in products stored at refrigeration temperatures (4 to 8 degrees C). Cereulide is not inactivated by heating during food processing. Therefore, direct analysis of this toxin in food is preferable to cultivating methods for assessing the risk of food poisoning by emetic B. cereus.",
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Potential of Bacillus cereus for producing an emetic toxin, cereulide, in bakery products : Quantitative analysis by chemical and biological methods. / Jääskeläinen, Elina (Corresponding Author); Häggblom, Max; Andersson, Maria; Vanne, Liisa; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja.

In: Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 66, No. 6, 2003, p. 1047-1054.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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