Production and sensory analysis of grape flavoured beer by co-fermentation of an industrial and a genetically modified laboratory yeast strain

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Abstract

The so-called “craft beer revolution” has increased the demand for new styles of beers, often with new ingredients like flavour extracts. In recent years, synthetic biology has realized the production of a plethora of plant secondary metabolites in microbial hosts, which could provide an alternative source for these compounds. In this study, we selected a in situ flavour production approach for grape flavour addition. We used an O-methyl anthranilate (OmANT) producing laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain in co-fermentations with an industrial beer yeast strain WLP644. The laboratory strain provided an ease of genetic manipulation and the desirable properties of the WLP644 strain were not modified in this approach. In shake flasks, a 10:90 ratio of the yeasts produced grape flavoured beer with the yeast produced flavour compound in a range normally used for flavoured beverages. Hopped and unhopped beers were analysed by VTT’s trained sensory panel and with olfactory GC–MS. OmANT was successfully detected from the beers as a floral odour and flavour. Moreover, no off-flavours were detected and aroma profiles outside the grape flavour were rather similar. These results indicate that the co-fermentation principle is a suitable approach to change the flavour profiles of beers with a simple yeast strain drop-in approach.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1991–2000
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Food Research and Technology
Volume249
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2023
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Brewing
  • Co-fermentation
  • Flavour
  • Methyl anthranilate
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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