Prospects of seismic upgrading a weak r.c. school building using light gauge steel walls

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    Significant number of reinforced concrete building frames executed in the '50's-60's in Europe need seismic upgrading. At those times understanding of earthquake effects was insufficient and quality control on construction sites lacking. This combination resulted in buildings framed in reinforced concrete with bad quality materials and inadequate reinforcement. The low-medium rise buildings often house public functions today. In this paper, we analyze the potentials and limitations of using light prefabricated steel wall systems (LGSW) to upgrade frames to higher seismic standard. Results show that r.c. frames with virtually no seismic resistance (PGA~0.05·g) can be upgraded to resist intermediate earthquakes, possibly up to PGA~0.2·g. The LGSW's have remarkable flexibility to adapt to the refurbishment requirements in terms of stiffness and strength, and also provide adequate ductility.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)179-184
    JournalApplied Mechanics and Materials
    Volume777
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Fingerprint

    School buildings
    Gages
    Reinforced concrete
    Earthquake effects
    Concrete buildings
    Steel
    Quality control
    Ductility
    Earthquakes
    Reinforcement
    Stiffness

    Keywords

    • weak r.c. buildings
    • earthquake resistance
    • refurbishment
    • light-gauge steel shear walls (LGSW)
    • pushover method

    Cite this

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    title = "Prospects of seismic upgrading a weak r.c. school building using light gauge steel walls",
    abstract = "Significant number of reinforced concrete building frames executed in the '50's-60's in Europe need seismic upgrading. At those times understanding of earthquake effects was insufficient and quality control on construction sites lacking. This combination resulted in buildings framed in reinforced concrete with bad quality materials and inadequate reinforcement. The low-medium rise buildings often house public functions today. In this paper, we analyze the potentials and limitations of using light prefabricated steel wall systems (LGSW) to upgrade frames to higher seismic standard. Results show that r.c. frames with virtually no seismic resistance (PGA~0.05·g) can be upgraded to resist intermediate earthquakes, possibly up to PGA~0.2·g. The LGSW's have remarkable flexibility to adapt to the refurbishment requirements in terms of stiffness and strength, and also provide adequate ductility.",
    keywords = "weak r.c. buildings, earthquake resistance, refurbishment, light-gauge steel shear walls (LGSW), pushover method",
    author = "Ludovic F{\"u}l{\"o}p",
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    }

    Prospects of seismic upgrading a weak r.c. school building using light gauge steel walls. / Fülöp, Ludovic.

    In: Applied Mechanics and Materials, Vol. 777, 2015, p. 179-184.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

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    AU - Fülöp, Ludovic

    PY - 2015

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    AB - Significant number of reinforced concrete building frames executed in the '50's-60's in Europe need seismic upgrading. At those times understanding of earthquake effects was insufficient and quality control on construction sites lacking. This combination resulted in buildings framed in reinforced concrete with bad quality materials and inadequate reinforcement. The low-medium rise buildings often house public functions today. In this paper, we analyze the potentials and limitations of using light prefabricated steel wall systems (LGSW) to upgrade frames to higher seismic standard. Results show that r.c. frames with virtually no seismic resistance (PGA~0.05·g) can be upgraded to resist intermediate earthquakes, possibly up to PGA~0.2·g. The LGSW's have remarkable flexibility to adapt to the refurbishment requirements in terms of stiffness and strength, and also provide adequate ductility.

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