Recovery of N100 component of auditory event-related potentials and EEG after cardiac arrest during propofol sedation

S.M. Westerén-Punnonen (Corresponding Author), Heidi Yppärilä, T. Musialowicz, Ilkka Korhonen, M. Hynynen, J. Partanen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on the EEG monitoring of a patient who suffered an episode of postoperative ventricular fibrillation (VF) following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). VF initially caused a considerable suppression and slowing of the EEG. The recovery of cerebral function was evaluated by recording both EEG and auditory event related potentials (ERPs). Six hours after the episode of VF, when the patient was asleep but arousable to voice command, the N100 component of the auditory ERPs had recovered to the level measured before the operation, whereas the EEG was still very slow for that level of sedation. This may have been due to VF having less effect on the N100 component than on the background EEG. Our findings suggest that measuring evoked potentials may improve the evaluation of brain function after cardiac arrest.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)626-629
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Propofol
Heart Arrest
Evoked Potentials
Ventricular Fibrillation
Electroencephalography
Recovery of Function
Physiologic Monitoring
Coronary Artery Bypass
Brain

Keywords

  • EEG
  • patient monitoring
  • ventricular fibrillation

Cite this

Westerén-Punnonen, S. M., Yppärilä, H., Musialowicz, T., Korhonen, I., Hynynen, M., & Partanen, J. (2005). Recovery of N100 component of auditory event-related potentials and EEG after cardiac arrest during propofol sedation. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 94(5), 626-629. https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aei096
Westerén-Punnonen, S.M. ; Yppärilä, Heidi ; Musialowicz, T. ; Korhonen, Ilkka ; Hynynen, M. ; Partanen, J. / Recovery of N100 component of auditory event-related potentials and EEG after cardiac arrest during propofol sedation. In: British Journal of Anaesthesia. 2005 ; Vol. 94, No. 5. pp. 626-629.
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abstract = "We report on the EEG monitoring of a patient who suffered an episode of postoperative ventricular fibrillation (VF) following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). VF initially caused a considerable suppression and slowing of the EEG. The recovery of cerebral function was evaluated by recording both EEG and auditory event related potentials (ERPs). Six hours after the episode of VF, when the patient was asleep but arousable to voice command, the N100 component of the auditory ERPs had recovered to the level measured before the operation, whereas the EEG was still very slow for that level of sedation. This may have been due to VF having less effect on the N100 component than on the background EEG. Our findings suggest that measuring evoked potentials may improve the evaluation of brain function after cardiac arrest.",
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Westerén-Punnonen, SM, Yppärilä, H, Musialowicz, T, Korhonen, I, Hynynen, M & Partanen, J 2005, 'Recovery of N100 component of auditory event-related potentials and EEG after cardiac arrest during propofol sedation', British Journal of Anaesthesia, vol. 94, no. 5, pp. 626-629. https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aei096

Recovery of N100 component of auditory event-related potentials and EEG after cardiac arrest during propofol sedation. / Westerén-Punnonen, S.M. (Corresponding Author); Yppärilä, Heidi; Musialowicz, T.; Korhonen, Ilkka; Hynynen, M.; Partanen, J.

In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 94, No. 5, 2005, p. 626-629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Yppärilä, Heidi

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AU - Partanen, J.

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