Research on Hold Time Effects in Fatigue of Stainless Steel

Simulation of Normal Operation Between Fatigue Transients

Jussi Solin, Sven Reese, H. Ertugrul Karabaki, Wolfgang Mayinger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In PVP2011-57942 we reported improved endurance in fatigue tests with intermediate annealing to roughly simulate steady state operation between fatigue transients in NPP components. Quantification of this effect is in focus of our continued research on fatigue performance of niobium stabilized stainless steel (1.4550, X6CrNiNb1810mod). Similar effect is expected in nuclear power plants during normal operation — e.g. in a PWR surge line or in pressurizer spray lines. Holds affect cyclic stress strain response. Stress amplitude, tensile mean stress and apparent elastic modulus are increased immediately after a hold, while decreased by cycles in between. Axial shortening is measured during hot holds at zero stress. This all suggest cyclic accumulation of lattice defects and recovery during holds. Recovery may occur through thermally activated dislocation migration together with diffusion, grouping and annihilation of lattice defects. More than one thermally activated processes control the rates of contraction during hold periods at elevated temperatures. Hold hardening delays crack formation by preventing plastic strain localization, in components also on macroscopic level. A mechanism informed model is sought for transferring laboratory data to real plant components in terms of improving accuracy of numerical fatigue usage assessment. Anticipated mechanisms behind gradual changes in material responses are discussed in relation to quantitative effects of holds.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME
Number of pages9
Volume1A
ISBN (Print)978-0-7918-5692-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, PVP 2015 - Boston, United States
Duration: 19 Jul 201523 Jul 2015

Conference

ConferenceASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, PVP 2015
Abbreviated titlePVP 2015
CountryUnited States
CityBoston
Period19/07/1523/07/15

Fingerprint

Stainless steel
Fatigue of materials
Crystal defects
Recovery
Niobium
Crack initiation
Nuclear power plants
Process control
Hardening
Plastic deformation
Durability
Elastic moduli
Annealing
Temperature

Cite this

Solin, J., Reese, S., Karabaki, H. E., & Mayinger, W. (2015). Research on Hold Time Effects in Fatigue of Stainless Steel: Simulation of Normal Operation Between Fatigue Transients. In ASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference (Vol. 1A). [PVP2015-45098] American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME. https://doi.org/10.1115/PVP2015-45098
Solin, Jussi ; Reese, Sven ; Karabaki, H. Ertugrul ; Mayinger, Wolfgang. / Research on Hold Time Effects in Fatigue of Stainless Steel : Simulation of Normal Operation Between Fatigue Transients. ASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. Vol. 1A American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME, 2015.
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abstract = "In PVP2011-57942 we reported improved endurance in fatigue tests with intermediate annealing to roughly simulate steady state operation between fatigue transients in NPP components. Quantification of this effect is in focus of our continued research on fatigue performance of niobium stabilized stainless steel (1.4550, X6CrNiNb1810mod). Similar effect is expected in nuclear power plants during normal operation — e.g. in a PWR surge line or in pressurizer spray lines. Holds affect cyclic stress strain response. Stress amplitude, tensile mean stress and apparent elastic modulus are increased immediately after a hold, while decreased by cycles in between. Axial shortening is measured during hot holds at zero stress. This all suggest cyclic accumulation of lattice defects and recovery during holds. Recovery may occur through thermally activated dislocation migration together with diffusion, grouping and annihilation of lattice defects. More than one thermally activated processes control the rates of contraction during hold periods at elevated temperatures. Hold hardening delays crack formation by preventing plastic strain localization, in components also on macroscopic level. A mechanism informed model is sought for transferring laboratory data to real plant components in terms of improving accuracy of numerical fatigue usage assessment. Anticipated mechanisms behind gradual changes in material responses are discussed in relation to quantitative effects of holds.",
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Solin, J, Reese, S, Karabaki, HE & Mayinger, W 2015, Research on Hold Time Effects in Fatigue of Stainless Steel: Simulation of Normal Operation Between Fatigue Transients. in ASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. vol. 1A, PVP2015-45098, American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME, ASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, PVP 2015, Boston, United States, 19/07/15. https://doi.org/10.1115/PVP2015-45098

Research on Hold Time Effects in Fatigue of Stainless Steel : Simulation of Normal Operation Between Fatigue Transients. / Solin, Jussi; Reese, Sven; Karabaki, H. Ertugrul; Mayinger, Wolfgang.

ASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. Vol. 1A American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME, 2015. PVP2015-45098.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

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AU - Reese, Sven

AU - Karabaki, H. Ertugrul

AU - Mayinger, Wolfgang

PY - 2015

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AB - In PVP2011-57942 we reported improved endurance in fatigue tests with intermediate annealing to roughly simulate steady state operation between fatigue transients in NPP components. Quantification of this effect is in focus of our continued research on fatigue performance of niobium stabilized stainless steel (1.4550, X6CrNiNb1810mod). Similar effect is expected in nuclear power plants during normal operation — e.g. in a PWR surge line or in pressurizer spray lines. Holds affect cyclic stress strain response. Stress amplitude, tensile mean stress and apparent elastic modulus are increased immediately after a hold, while decreased by cycles in between. Axial shortening is measured during hot holds at zero stress. This all suggest cyclic accumulation of lattice defects and recovery during holds. Recovery may occur through thermally activated dislocation migration together with diffusion, grouping and annihilation of lattice defects. More than one thermally activated processes control the rates of contraction during hold periods at elevated temperatures. Hold hardening delays crack formation by preventing plastic strain localization, in components also on macroscopic level. A mechanism informed model is sought for transferring laboratory data to real plant components in terms of improving accuracy of numerical fatigue usage assessment. Anticipated mechanisms behind gradual changes in material responses are discussed in relation to quantitative effects of holds.

U2 - 10.1115/PVP2015-45098

DO - 10.1115/PVP2015-45098

M3 - Conference article in proceedings

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Solin J, Reese S, Karabaki HE, Mayinger W. Research on Hold Time Effects in Fatigue of Stainless Steel: Simulation of Normal Operation Between Fatigue Transients. In ASME 2015 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. Vol. 1A. American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME. 2015. PVP2015-45098 https://doi.org/10.1115/PVP2015-45098