Signal processing in prolonged EEG recordings during intensive care

Mark van Gils, Annelise Rosenfalck, Steven White, Pamela Prior, John Grade, Lotfi Senhadji, Carsten Thomsen, Robert Ghosh, Richard Langford, Jensen Kjeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methods for analyzing and displaying EEG signals are discussed. The increasing availability and affordability of powerful computer equipment makes possible the use of ever more sophisticated signal processing techniques, which extract relevant (but not readily discernible) information from long-term EEG recordings and can easily identify important features in the EEG. Whether these techniques are actually taken up in clinical practice is heavily dependent on how well they match clinical requirements. This article concentrates on requirements set in the context of long-term recordings in the ICU that demand the ability to process short-term discrete events as well as long-term trend information. A huge range of potentially useful signal processing techniques exists. This article illustrates the value of some of these techniques for ICU signals using the EEG recordings collected during the IMPROVE project
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-63
JournalIEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Electroencephalography
Signal processing
Intensive care units
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van Gils, Mark ; Rosenfalck, Annelise ; White, Steven ; Prior, Pamela ; Grade, John ; Senhadji, Lotfi ; Thomsen, Carsten ; Ghosh, Robert ; Langford, Richard ; Kjeld, Jensen. / Signal processing in prolonged EEG recordings during intensive care. In: IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine. 1997 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 56-63.
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van Gils, M, Rosenfalck, A, White, S, Prior, P, Grade, J, Senhadji, L, Thomsen, C, Ghosh, R, Langford, R & Kjeld, J 1997, 'Signal processing in prolonged EEG recordings during intensive care', IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 56-63. https://doi.org/10.1109/51.637118

Signal processing in prolonged EEG recordings during intensive care. / van Gils, Mark; Rosenfalck, Annelise; White, Steven; Prior, Pamela; Grade, John; Senhadji, Lotfi; Thomsen, Carsten; Ghosh, Robert; Langford, Richard; Kjeld, Jensen.

In: IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1997, p. 56-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - van Gils, Mark

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AU - Senhadji, Lotfi

AU - Thomsen, Carsten

AU - Ghosh, Robert

AU - Langford, Richard

AU - Kjeld, Jensen

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AB - Methods for analyzing and displaying EEG signals are discussed. The increasing availability and affordability of powerful computer equipment makes possible the use of ever more sophisticated signal processing techniques, which extract relevant (but not readily discernible) information from long-term EEG recordings and can easily identify important features in the EEG. Whether these techniques are actually taken up in clinical practice is heavily dependent on how well they match clinical requirements. This article concentrates on requirements set in the context of long-term recordings in the ICU that demand the ability to process short-term discrete events as well as long-term trend information. A huge range of potentially useful signal processing techniques exists. This article illustrates the value of some of these techniques for ICU signals using the EEG recordings collected during the IMPROVE project

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