Steam explosion of Brewer’s spent grain improves enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates and affects solubility and stability of proteins

K. Kemppainen, K. Rommi, U. Holopainen, K. Kruus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Steam explosion was studied as a means to improve the enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates in Brewer’s spent grain, a protein and lipid-rich lignocellulosic by-product of the brewing industry. Having temperature, treatment time and the presence of acid catalyst as variables, a treatment at 200 °C for 10 min without an acid catalyst was found to be the most efficient, dissolving 12.1 % of the dry matter. Mainly oligomeric non-cellulosic glucan and arabinoxylan were dissolved, and the remaining insoluble carbohydrates could be efficiently hydrolysed by an enzyme cocktail (75 % hydrolysis yield). The process also caused partial protein degradation and dissolved over a third of the total nitrogen. Meanwhile, the insoluble protein appeared to become more strongly associated with acid-insoluble lignin. Compositional changes observed in the proteins and carbohydrates were supported by the results of epifluorescence microscopy. The process yielded three chemically different fractions which could serve as biorefinery products or intermediates.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-108
JournalApplied Biochemistry and Biotechnology
Volume180
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2016
MoE publication typeNot Eligible

Fingerprint

Explosions
Protein Stability
Steam
Carbohydrates
Solubility
Proteins
Acids
Glucans
Lignin
Brewing
Proteolysis
Catalysts
Microscopy
Industry
Hydrolysis
Nitrogen
Lipids
Byproducts
Microscopic examination
Temperature

Keywords

  • Brewer's spent grain
  • Pretreatment
  • Enzymatic hydrolysis
  • Microscopy
  • Biorefinery

Cite this

@article{7dcf4a173c6846b6b282b2e915736e6d,
title = "Steam explosion of Brewer’s spent grain improves enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates and affects solubility and stability of proteins",
abstract = "Steam explosion was studied as a means to improve the enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates in Brewer’s spent grain, a protein and lipid-rich lignocellulosic by-product of the brewing industry. Having temperature, treatment time and the presence of acid catalyst as variables, a treatment at 200 °C for 10 min without an acid catalyst was found to be the most efficient, dissolving 12.1 {\%} of the dry matter. Mainly oligomeric non-cellulosic glucan and arabinoxylan were dissolved, and the remaining insoluble carbohydrates could be efficiently hydrolysed by an enzyme cocktail (75 {\%} hydrolysis yield). The process also caused partial protein degradation and dissolved over a third of the total nitrogen. Meanwhile, the insoluble protein appeared to become more strongly associated with acid-insoluble lignin. Compositional changes observed in the proteins and carbohydrates were supported by the results of epifluorescence microscopy. The process yielded three chemically different fractions which could serve as biorefinery products or intermediates.",
keywords = "Brewer's spent grain, Pretreatment, Enzymatic hydrolysis, Microscopy, Biorefinery",
author = "K. Kemppainen and K. Rommi and U. Holopainen and K. Kruus",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1007/s12010-016-2085-9",
language = "English",
volume = "180",
pages = "94--108",
journal = "Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology",
issn = "0273-2289",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

Steam explosion of Brewer’s spent grain improves enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates and affects solubility and stability of proteins. / Kemppainen, K.; Rommi, K.; Holopainen, U.; Kruus, K.

In: Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Vol. 180, No. 1, 15.04.2016, p. 94-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Steam explosion of Brewer’s spent grain improves enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates and affects solubility and stability of proteins

AU - Kemppainen, K.

AU - Rommi, K.

AU - Holopainen, U.

AU - Kruus, K.

PY - 2016/4/15

Y1 - 2016/4/15

N2 - Steam explosion was studied as a means to improve the enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates in Brewer’s spent grain, a protein and lipid-rich lignocellulosic by-product of the brewing industry. Having temperature, treatment time and the presence of acid catalyst as variables, a treatment at 200 °C for 10 min without an acid catalyst was found to be the most efficient, dissolving 12.1 % of the dry matter. Mainly oligomeric non-cellulosic glucan and arabinoxylan were dissolved, and the remaining insoluble carbohydrates could be efficiently hydrolysed by an enzyme cocktail (75 % hydrolysis yield). The process also caused partial protein degradation and dissolved over a third of the total nitrogen. Meanwhile, the insoluble protein appeared to become more strongly associated with acid-insoluble lignin. Compositional changes observed in the proteins and carbohydrates were supported by the results of epifluorescence microscopy. The process yielded three chemically different fractions which could serve as biorefinery products or intermediates.

AB - Steam explosion was studied as a means to improve the enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates in Brewer’s spent grain, a protein and lipid-rich lignocellulosic by-product of the brewing industry. Having temperature, treatment time and the presence of acid catalyst as variables, a treatment at 200 °C for 10 min without an acid catalyst was found to be the most efficient, dissolving 12.1 % of the dry matter. Mainly oligomeric non-cellulosic glucan and arabinoxylan were dissolved, and the remaining insoluble carbohydrates could be efficiently hydrolysed by an enzyme cocktail (75 % hydrolysis yield). The process also caused partial protein degradation and dissolved over a third of the total nitrogen. Meanwhile, the insoluble protein appeared to become more strongly associated with acid-insoluble lignin. Compositional changes observed in the proteins and carbohydrates were supported by the results of epifluorescence microscopy. The process yielded three chemically different fractions which could serve as biorefinery products or intermediates.

KW - Brewer's spent grain

KW - Pretreatment

KW - Enzymatic hydrolysis

KW - Microscopy

KW - Biorefinery

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84963765807&partnerID=MN8TOARS

U2 - 10.1007/s12010-016-2085-9

DO - 10.1007/s12010-016-2085-9

M3 - Article

VL - 180

SP - 94

EP - 108

JO - Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

JF - Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

SN - 0273-2289

IS - 1

ER -