Structural mechanisms leading to improved water retention in acid milk gels by use of transglutaminase

Dilek Ercili Cura (Corresponding Author), Martina Lille, D. Legland, S. Gaucel, Kaisa Poutanen, Riitta Partanen, Raija Lantto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Water retention in transglutaminase (TG)-treated acid milk gels was studied and linked with the gel formation dynamics. Heat-treated skim milk with and without pre-treatment by TG was acidified at 20 °C, 30 °C and 40 °C at constant glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) level to obtain different acidification rates. Formation dynamics and structural properties of acid-induced gels were followed by rheological and near-infrared light backscattering measurements as well as microscopy. TG-treated gels showed decreased tan δ values all through the acidification, which was pronounced around the gelation point. Backscattered light intensity was lowered in TG-treated gels compared to the controls indicating that TG-treated gels were comprised of smaller aggregates. Water holding capacity (WHC) was measured by using centrifugation at selected pH points (pH 5.2, 5.0, 4.8 and 4.6) during acidification. Both acidification temperature and TG treatment had significant effects on the water retention properties of the gels. Spontaneous syneresis observed at high acidification temperatures (≥30 °C) was prevented upon TG-treatment. WHC of TG-treated gels was significantly higher compared to the control gels at all pH points. TG-treated milk gels showed a homogeneous network formed of smaller aggregate and pore sizes at the gelation point and did not show any large-scale re-organisation thereafter. Transglutaminase is likely to act as a fixative of the protein network at an early stage of gelation and thereby limiting network rearrangements that take place in acid milk gels formed at high acidification temperatures leading to contraction and subsequent wheying off.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-427
Number of pages9
JournalFood Hydrocolloids
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Transglutaminases
protein-glutamine gamma-glutamyltransferase
Milk
Gels
gels
milk
Acidification
Acids
Water
acids
acidification
water
Gelation
gelation
protein aggregates
water holding capacity
Temperature
Light
Fixatives
temperature

Keywords

  • Acidification
  • milk
  • syneresis
  • transglutaminase

Cite this

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title = "Structural mechanisms leading to improved water retention in acid milk gels by use of transglutaminase",
abstract = "Water retention in transglutaminase (TG)-treated acid milk gels was studied and linked with the gel formation dynamics. Heat-treated skim milk with and without pre-treatment by TG was acidified at 20 °C, 30 °C and 40 °C at constant glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) level to obtain different acidification rates. Formation dynamics and structural properties of acid-induced gels were followed by rheological and near-infrared light backscattering measurements as well as microscopy. TG-treated gels showed decreased tan δ values all through the acidification, which was pronounced around the gelation point. Backscattered light intensity was lowered in TG-treated gels compared to the controls indicating that TG-treated gels were comprised of smaller aggregates. Water holding capacity (WHC) was measured by using centrifugation at selected pH points (pH 5.2, 5.0, 4.8 and 4.6) during acidification. Both acidification temperature and TG treatment had significant effects on the water retention properties of the gels. Spontaneous syneresis observed at high acidification temperatures (≥30 °C) was prevented upon TG-treatment. WHC of TG-treated gels was significantly higher compared to the control gels at all pH points. TG-treated milk gels showed a homogeneous network formed of smaller aggregate and pore sizes at the gelation point and did not show any large-scale re-organisation thereafter. Transglutaminase is likely to act as a fixative of the protein network at an early stage of gelation and thereby limiting network rearrangements that take place in acid milk gels formed at high acidification temperatures leading to contraction and subsequent wheying off.",
keywords = "Acidification, milk, syneresis, transglutaminase",
author = "{Ercili Cura}, Dilek and Martina Lille and D. Legland and S. Gaucel and Kaisa Poutanen and Riitta Partanen and Raija Lantto",
year = "2013",
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language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "419--427",
journal = "Food Hydrocolloids",
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Structural mechanisms leading to improved water retention in acid milk gels by use of transglutaminase. / Ercili Cura, Dilek (Corresponding Author); Lille, Martina; Legland, D.; Gaucel, S.; Poutanen, Kaisa; Partanen, Riitta; Lantto, Raija.

In: Food Hydrocolloids, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2013, p. 419-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Structural mechanisms leading to improved water retention in acid milk gels by use of transglutaminase

AU - Ercili Cura, Dilek

AU - Lille, Martina

AU - Legland, D.

AU - Gaucel, S.

AU - Poutanen, Kaisa

AU - Partanen, Riitta

AU - Lantto, Raija

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Water retention in transglutaminase (TG)-treated acid milk gels was studied and linked with the gel formation dynamics. Heat-treated skim milk with and without pre-treatment by TG was acidified at 20 °C, 30 °C and 40 °C at constant glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) level to obtain different acidification rates. Formation dynamics and structural properties of acid-induced gels were followed by rheological and near-infrared light backscattering measurements as well as microscopy. TG-treated gels showed decreased tan δ values all through the acidification, which was pronounced around the gelation point. Backscattered light intensity was lowered in TG-treated gels compared to the controls indicating that TG-treated gels were comprised of smaller aggregates. Water holding capacity (WHC) was measured by using centrifugation at selected pH points (pH 5.2, 5.0, 4.8 and 4.6) during acidification. Both acidification temperature and TG treatment had significant effects on the water retention properties of the gels. Spontaneous syneresis observed at high acidification temperatures (≥30 °C) was prevented upon TG-treatment. WHC of TG-treated gels was significantly higher compared to the control gels at all pH points. TG-treated milk gels showed a homogeneous network formed of smaller aggregate and pore sizes at the gelation point and did not show any large-scale re-organisation thereafter. Transglutaminase is likely to act as a fixative of the protein network at an early stage of gelation and thereby limiting network rearrangements that take place in acid milk gels formed at high acidification temperatures leading to contraction and subsequent wheying off.

AB - Water retention in transglutaminase (TG)-treated acid milk gels was studied and linked with the gel formation dynamics. Heat-treated skim milk with and without pre-treatment by TG was acidified at 20 °C, 30 °C and 40 °C at constant glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) level to obtain different acidification rates. Formation dynamics and structural properties of acid-induced gels were followed by rheological and near-infrared light backscattering measurements as well as microscopy. TG-treated gels showed decreased tan δ values all through the acidification, which was pronounced around the gelation point. Backscattered light intensity was lowered in TG-treated gels compared to the controls indicating that TG-treated gels were comprised of smaller aggregates. Water holding capacity (WHC) was measured by using centrifugation at selected pH points (pH 5.2, 5.0, 4.8 and 4.6) during acidification. Both acidification temperature and TG treatment had significant effects on the water retention properties of the gels. Spontaneous syneresis observed at high acidification temperatures (≥30 °C) was prevented upon TG-treatment. WHC of TG-treated gels was significantly higher compared to the control gels at all pH points. TG-treated milk gels showed a homogeneous network formed of smaller aggregate and pore sizes at the gelation point and did not show any large-scale re-organisation thereafter. Transglutaminase is likely to act as a fixative of the protein network at an early stage of gelation and thereby limiting network rearrangements that take place in acid milk gels formed at high acidification temperatures leading to contraction and subsequent wheying off.

KW - Acidification

KW - milk

KW - syneresis

KW - transglutaminase

U2 - 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2012.07.008

DO - 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2012.07.008

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 419

EP - 427

JO - Food Hydrocolloids

JF - Food Hydrocolloids

SN - 0268-005X

IS - 1

ER -