Testing of decay resistance of sapwood and heartwood of thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce

Hannu Viitanen, Sini Metsä-Kortelainen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientific

Abstract

Thermal modification at elevated temperatures changes the chemical, biological and physical properties of wood. One of the main targets of thermal modification is to increase the biological durability and decay resistance of wood. Although the effects of thermal modification on wood have been widely studied, the significance of sapwood and heartwood on the resistance of thermally modified wood has been paid less attention. In this study the effects of thermal modification at four different temperatures (170°C, 190°C, 210°C and 230°C) on resistance against soft- and brown-rot fungi of sapwood and heartwood of Scots pine and Norway spruce were investigated using accelerated laboratory test methods. Natural durability against the soft-rot micro-fungi was determined according to CEN/TS 15083-2 by measuring the mass loss and modulus of elasticity (MOE) loss after an incubation period of 32 weeks. Test material was also exposed to brown-rot fungi Coniophora puteana and Poria placenta essentially according to a mini-decay test using two exposure periods (6 and 10 weeks). On average, the soft-rot and brown-rot tests gave quite similar results. However, the brown-rot test gave slightly better durability classes than the soft-rot test. The untreated heartwood of Scots pine was more durable against decay organisms than the sapwood of Scots pine and the sapwood or heartwood of Norway spruce. The differences between sapwood and heartwood were more significant within pine than within spruce material. The thermal modification significantly increased the decay resistance of all pine and spruce samples. The higher the level of thermal modification, the better biological durability and resistance against decay will be achieved.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe 41st Annual Meeting of International Research Group on Wood Protection
Subtitle of host publicationBiarritz, France, May 9-13 2010
Publication statusPublished - 2010
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
Event41st Annual Meeting of IRG-WP International Research Group on Wood Protection - Biarritz, France
Duration: 9 May 201013 May 2010

Publication series

NameIRG/WP 10-40523
PublisherIRG, International Research Group on Wood protection (2010)

Conference

Conference41st Annual Meeting of IRG-WP International Research Group on Wood Protection
CountryFrance
CityBiarritz
Period9/05/1013/05/10

Fingerprint

decay resistance
heartwood
sapwood
Pinus sylvestris
Picea abies
durability
heat
brown-rot fungi
testing
Picea
soft-rot fungi
Pinus
wood physical properties
Rhodonia placenta
Coniophora puteana
deterioration
modulus of elasticity
exposure duration
temperature
fungi

Keywords

  • brown rot
  • decay
  • durability
  • exposure
  • heartwood
  • mass loss
  • MOE
  • moisture
  • natural durability
  • pine
  • sapwood
  • soft rot
  • spruce
  • testing
  • wood material

Cite this

Viitanen, H., & Metsä-Kortelainen, S. (2010). Testing of decay resistance of sapwood and heartwood of thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce. In The 41st Annual Meeting of International Research Group on Wood Protection: Biarritz, France, May 9-13 2010 [IRG/WP 10-40523]
Viitanen, Hannu ; Metsä-Kortelainen, Sini. / Testing of decay resistance of sapwood and heartwood of thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce. The 41st Annual Meeting of International Research Group on Wood Protection: Biarritz, France, May 9-13 2010. 2010.
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abstract = "Thermal modification at elevated temperatures changes the chemical, biological and physical properties of wood. One of the main targets of thermal modification is to increase the biological durability and decay resistance of wood. Although the effects of thermal modification on wood have been widely studied, the significance of sapwood and heartwood on the resistance of thermally modified wood has been paid less attention. In this study the effects of thermal modification at four different temperatures (170°C, 190°C, 210°C and 230°C) on resistance against soft- and brown-rot fungi of sapwood and heartwood of Scots pine and Norway spruce were investigated using accelerated laboratory test methods. Natural durability against the soft-rot micro-fungi was determined according to CEN/TS 15083-2 by measuring the mass loss and modulus of elasticity (MOE) loss after an incubation period of 32 weeks. Test material was also exposed to brown-rot fungi Coniophora puteana and Poria placenta essentially according to a mini-decay test using two exposure periods (6 and 10 weeks). On average, the soft-rot and brown-rot tests gave quite similar results. However, the brown-rot test gave slightly better durability classes than the soft-rot test. The untreated heartwood of Scots pine was more durable against decay organisms than the sapwood of Scots pine and the sapwood or heartwood of Norway spruce. The differences between sapwood and heartwood were more significant within pine than within spruce material. The thermal modification significantly increased the decay resistance of all pine and spruce samples. The higher the level of thermal modification, the better biological durability and resistance against decay will be achieved.",
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Viitanen, H & Metsä-Kortelainen, S 2010, Testing of decay resistance of sapwood and heartwood of thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce. in The 41st Annual Meeting of International Research Group on Wood Protection: Biarritz, France, May 9-13 2010., IRG/WP 10-40523, 41st Annual Meeting of IRG-WP International Research Group on Wood Protection, Biarritz, France, 9/05/10.

Testing of decay resistance of sapwood and heartwood of thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce. / Viitanen, Hannu; Metsä-Kortelainen, Sini.

The 41st Annual Meeting of International Research Group on Wood Protection: Biarritz, France, May 9-13 2010. 2010. IRG/WP 10-40523.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientific

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T1 - Testing of decay resistance of sapwood and heartwood of thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce

AU - Viitanen, Hannu

AU - Metsä-Kortelainen, Sini

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Thermal modification at elevated temperatures changes the chemical, biological and physical properties of wood. One of the main targets of thermal modification is to increase the biological durability and decay resistance of wood. Although the effects of thermal modification on wood have been widely studied, the significance of sapwood and heartwood on the resistance of thermally modified wood has been paid less attention. In this study the effects of thermal modification at four different temperatures (170°C, 190°C, 210°C and 230°C) on resistance against soft- and brown-rot fungi of sapwood and heartwood of Scots pine and Norway spruce were investigated using accelerated laboratory test methods. Natural durability against the soft-rot micro-fungi was determined according to CEN/TS 15083-2 by measuring the mass loss and modulus of elasticity (MOE) loss after an incubation period of 32 weeks. Test material was also exposed to brown-rot fungi Coniophora puteana and Poria placenta essentially according to a mini-decay test using two exposure periods (6 and 10 weeks). On average, the soft-rot and brown-rot tests gave quite similar results. However, the brown-rot test gave slightly better durability classes than the soft-rot test. The untreated heartwood of Scots pine was more durable against decay organisms than the sapwood of Scots pine and the sapwood or heartwood of Norway spruce. The differences between sapwood and heartwood were more significant within pine than within spruce material. The thermal modification significantly increased the decay resistance of all pine and spruce samples. The higher the level of thermal modification, the better biological durability and resistance against decay will be achieved.

AB - Thermal modification at elevated temperatures changes the chemical, biological and physical properties of wood. One of the main targets of thermal modification is to increase the biological durability and decay resistance of wood. Although the effects of thermal modification on wood have been widely studied, the significance of sapwood and heartwood on the resistance of thermally modified wood has been paid less attention. In this study the effects of thermal modification at four different temperatures (170°C, 190°C, 210°C and 230°C) on resistance against soft- and brown-rot fungi of sapwood and heartwood of Scots pine and Norway spruce were investigated using accelerated laboratory test methods. Natural durability against the soft-rot micro-fungi was determined according to CEN/TS 15083-2 by measuring the mass loss and modulus of elasticity (MOE) loss after an incubation period of 32 weeks. Test material was also exposed to brown-rot fungi Coniophora puteana and Poria placenta essentially according to a mini-decay test using two exposure periods (6 and 10 weeks). On average, the soft-rot and brown-rot tests gave quite similar results. However, the brown-rot test gave slightly better durability classes than the soft-rot test. The untreated heartwood of Scots pine was more durable against decay organisms than the sapwood of Scots pine and the sapwood or heartwood of Norway spruce. The differences between sapwood and heartwood were more significant within pine than within spruce material. The thermal modification significantly increased the decay resistance of all pine and spruce samples. The higher the level of thermal modification, the better biological durability and resistance against decay will be achieved.

KW - brown rot

KW - decay

KW - durability

KW - exposure

KW - heartwood

KW - mass loss

KW - MOE

KW - moisture

KW - natural durability

KW - pine

KW - sapwood

KW - soft rot

KW - spruce

KW - testing

KW - wood material

M3 - Conference article in proceedings

T3 - IRG/WP 10-40523

BT - The 41st Annual Meeting of International Research Group on Wood Protection

ER -

Viitanen H, Metsä-Kortelainen S. Testing of decay resistance of sapwood and heartwood of thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce. In The 41st Annual Meeting of International Research Group on Wood Protection: Biarritz, France, May 9-13 2010. 2010. IRG/WP 10-40523