The global inventor gap 1990-2005

Measuring catch-up and stagnation in inventors between world regions

Hannes Toivanen, Arho Suominen

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther conference contributionScientific

Abstract

The geography of global inventive effort reflects a central trend of globalization and countries ability to move towards knowledge economy. In stylized postulation, the number of inventors in a country is indicative about its situation in the global innovation ecosystem and the status of its knowledge economy. Obviously, such a measure enables much speculation about the nature and direction of global development, and especially about the relationship between advanced and developing countries. In an effort to cast light on this development on global scale, this paper explores empirically how the inventor gap between advanced economies, emerging economies, and developing countries is evolving 1990-2005. Instead of relying on existing indicators or measures (e.g. Archibugi and Coco, 2004; Fagerberg et al., 2007), we develop new distance-to-frontier indicator to measure the global inventor gap. Based on fractional count of inventors from different countries, we estimate the inventor intensity (measured as fractional patents per population) for 50 countries and for the rest of major world regions, and then how different countries evolve relative to the defined world frontier between 1990 and 2005. The central objective is to measure what type of countries (or clusters of countries) are able to move towards global frontier in inventor-per-population measure, what countries are able to catch-up significantly, and what countries are falling behind.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2013
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
Event5th Biennial Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy - Atlanta, United States
Duration: 26 Sep 201328 Sep 2013
Conference number: 5

Conference

Conference5th Biennial Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta
Period26/09/1328/09/13

Fingerprint

Catch-up
Stagnation
Inventor
Knowledge economy
Developing countries
Speculation
Globalization
Ecosystem
Emerging economies
Patents
Innovation
Geography

Keywords

  • patents
  • inventors
  • global gaps
  • development
  • catch-up
  • innovation

Cite this

Toivanen, H., & Suominen, A. (2013). The global inventor gap 1990-2005: Measuring catch-up and stagnation in inventors between world regions. 5th Biennial Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, Atlanta, United States.
Toivanen, Hannes ; Suominen, Arho. / The global inventor gap 1990-2005 : Measuring catch-up and stagnation in inventors between world regions. 5th Biennial Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, Atlanta, United States.
@conference{bed186f70f064296b36236cc4fd46d2d,
title = "The global inventor gap 1990-2005: Measuring catch-up and stagnation in inventors between world regions",
abstract = "The geography of global inventive effort reflects a central trend of globalization and countries ability to move towards knowledge economy. In stylized postulation, the number of inventors in a country is indicative about its situation in the global innovation ecosystem and the status of its knowledge economy. Obviously, such a measure enables much speculation about the nature and direction of global development, and especially about the relationship between advanced and developing countries. In an effort to cast light on this development on global scale, this paper explores empirically how the inventor gap between advanced economies, emerging economies, and developing countries is evolving 1990-2005. Instead of relying on existing indicators or measures (e.g. Archibugi and Coco, 2004; Fagerberg et al., 2007), we develop new distance-to-frontier indicator to measure the global inventor gap. Based on fractional count of inventors from different countries, we estimate the inventor intensity (measured as fractional patents per population) for 50 countries and for the rest of major world regions, and then how different countries evolve relative to the defined world frontier between 1990 and 2005. The central objective is to measure what type of countries (or clusters of countries) are able to move towards global frontier in inventor-per-population measure, what countries are able to catch-up significantly, and what countries are falling behind.",
keywords = "patents, inventors, global gaps, development, catch-up, innovation",
author = "Hannes Toivanen and Arho Suominen",
note = "Project code: 75913; 5th Biennial Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy ; Conference date: 26-09-2013 Through 28-09-2013",
year = "2013",
language = "English",

}

Toivanen, H & Suominen, A 2013, 'The global inventor gap 1990-2005: Measuring catch-up and stagnation in inventors between world regions' 5th Biennial Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, Atlanta, United States, 26/09/13 - 28/09/13, .

The global inventor gap 1990-2005 : Measuring catch-up and stagnation in inventors between world regions. / Toivanen, Hannes; Suominen, Arho.

2013. 5th Biennial Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, Atlanta, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther conference contributionScientific

TY - CONF

T1 - The global inventor gap 1990-2005

T2 - Measuring catch-up and stagnation in inventors between world regions

AU - Toivanen, Hannes

AU - Suominen, Arho

N1 - Project code: 75913

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - The geography of global inventive effort reflects a central trend of globalization and countries ability to move towards knowledge economy. In stylized postulation, the number of inventors in a country is indicative about its situation in the global innovation ecosystem and the status of its knowledge economy. Obviously, such a measure enables much speculation about the nature and direction of global development, and especially about the relationship between advanced and developing countries. In an effort to cast light on this development on global scale, this paper explores empirically how the inventor gap between advanced economies, emerging economies, and developing countries is evolving 1990-2005. Instead of relying on existing indicators or measures (e.g. Archibugi and Coco, 2004; Fagerberg et al., 2007), we develop new distance-to-frontier indicator to measure the global inventor gap. Based on fractional count of inventors from different countries, we estimate the inventor intensity (measured as fractional patents per population) for 50 countries and for the rest of major world regions, and then how different countries evolve relative to the defined world frontier between 1990 and 2005. The central objective is to measure what type of countries (or clusters of countries) are able to move towards global frontier in inventor-per-population measure, what countries are able to catch-up significantly, and what countries are falling behind.

AB - The geography of global inventive effort reflects a central trend of globalization and countries ability to move towards knowledge economy. In stylized postulation, the number of inventors in a country is indicative about its situation in the global innovation ecosystem and the status of its knowledge economy. Obviously, such a measure enables much speculation about the nature and direction of global development, and especially about the relationship between advanced and developing countries. In an effort to cast light on this development on global scale, this paper explores empirically how the inventor gap between advanced economies, emerging economies, and developing countries is evolving 1990-2005. Instead of relying on existing indicators or measures (e.g. Archibugi and Coco, 2004; Fagerberg et al., 2007), we develop new distance-to-frontier indicator to measure the global inventor gap. Based on fractional count of inventors from different countries, we estimate the inventor intensity (measured as fractional patents per population) for 50 countries and for the rest of major world regions, and then how different countries evolve relative to the defined world frontier between 1990 and 2005. The central objective is to measure what type of countries (or clusters of countries) are able to move towards global frontier in inventor-per-population measure, what countries are able to catch-up significantly, and what countries are falling behind.

KW - patents

KW - inventors

KW - global gaps

KW - development

KW - catch-up

KW - innovation

M3 - Other conference contribution

ER -

Toivanen H, Suominen A. The global inventor gap 1990-2005: Measuring catch-up and stagnation in inventors between world regions. 2013. 5th Biennial Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, Atlanta, United States.