The impact of fermentation with exopolysaccharide producing lactic acid bacteria on rheological, chemical and sensory properties of pureed carrots (Daucus carota L.)

Riikka Juvonen (Corresponding Author), Kaisu Honkapää, Ndegwa H. Maina, Qiao Shi, Kaarina Viljanen, Hannu Maaheimo, Liisa Virkki, Maija Tenkanen, Raija Lantto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fermentation with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) offers a natural means to modify technological and nutritional properties of foods and food ingredients. This study explored the impact of fermentation with different exopolysaccharide (EPS) producing LAB on rheological, chemical and sensory properties of puréed carrots in water, as a vegetable model, with the focus on texture formation. The screening of 37 LAB strains for starter selection revealed 16 Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc and Weissella strains capable of EPS (dextran, levan, and/or ?-glucan) production in the carrot raw material. Fermentations with five out of six selected EPS producers modified perceived texture of the liquid carrot model (p b 0.05). The formation of low-branched dextran correlated with perceived thickness, whereas the production of ß-glucan correlated with perceived elasticity. Low-branched dextran producing Weissella confusa and Leuconostoc lactis strains produced thick texture accompanied by pleasant odour and flavour. The fermentation with the selected EPS-producing LAB strains is a promising clean label approach to replace hydrocolloid additives as texturizers in vegetable containing products, not only carrot.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-118
JournalInternational Journal of Food Microbiology
Volume207
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • ß-glucan
  • carrot (Daucus carota L.)
  • dextran
  • fermentation
  • lactic acid bacteria
  • texture

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