The influence of crystalline and amorphous cellulose on extracellular hydrogen peroxide production by brown-rot fungi

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference articleScientific

Abstract

The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been suggested to play a key role in the degradation of wood by wood-rotting fungi. The production of extracellular hydrogen peroxide was studied by a quantitative method which detects the oxidation of the 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) by H2O2 and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in liquid culture medium. The carbon sources used were crystalline and amorphous cellulose. Two brown-rotters, Serpula lacrymans and Poria placenta, were able to produce clearly detectable amounts of extracellular hydrogen peroxide in liquid medium which contained crystalline cellulose as carbon source. No detectable H2O2 was produced in conditions where amorphous medium was used as carbon source. This result suggests that the conformational structure of the substrate may induce H2O2 production by brown-rot fungi.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
Publication statusPublished - 1991
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
Event22nd Annual Meeting of the International Group on Wood Preservation - Kyoto, Japan
Duration: 20 May 199124 May 1991

Conference

Conference22nd Annual Meeting of the International Group on Wood Preservation
Abbreviated title22nd IRGWP
CountryJapan
CityKyoto
Period20/05/9124/05/91

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