The liquid fraction from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw provides lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases with both electrons and H2O2 co-substrate

Riin Kont, Ville Pihlajaniemi, Anna S. Borisova, Nina Aro, Kaisa Marjamaa, Judith Loogen, Jochen Büchs, Vincent G.H. Eijsink, Kristiina Kruus, Priit Väljamaë (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Enzyme-aided valorization of lignocellulose represents a green and sustainable alternative to the traditional chemical industry. The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are important components of the state-of-the art enzyme cocktails for cellulose conversion. Yet, these monocopper enzymes are poorly characterized in terms of their kinetics, as exemplified by the growing evidence for that H2O2 may be a more efficient co-substrate for LPMOs than O2. LPMOs need external electron donors and one key question of relevance for bioprocess development is whether the required reducing power may be provided by the lignocellulosic substrate.
Results: Here, we show that the liquid fraction (LF) resulting from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw supports LPMO activity on both chitin and cellulose. The initial, transient activity burst of the LPMO reaction was caused by the H2O2 present in the LF before addition of LPMO, while the steady-state rate of LPMO reaction was limited by the LPMO-independent production of H2O2 in the LF. H2O2 is an intermediate of LF oxidation as evidenced by a slow H2O2 accumulation in LF, despite high H2O2 production rates. This H2O2 scavenging ability of LF is important since high concentrations of H2O2 may lead to irreversible inactivation of LPMOs.
Conclusions: Our results support the growing understanding that fine-tuned control over the rates of H2O2 production and consumption in different, enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions is essential for harnessing the full catalytic potential of LPMOs in lignocellulose valorization.

Original languageEnglish
Article number235
JournalBiotechnology for Biofuels
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Oct 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Straw
Polysaccharides
Mixed Function Oxygenases
polysaccharide
straw
Triticum
wheat
Electrons
substrate
electron
liquid
Liquids
Substrates
Enzymes
enzyme
Cellulose
cellulose
Chemical Industry
Enzyme kinetics
Chitin

Keywords

  • Cellulose
  • Chitin
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Hydrothermal pretreatment
  • Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase
  • Oxidation
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Serratia marcescens LPMO10A
  • Trichoderma reesei LPMO9A
  • Wheat straw

Cite this

@article{9c796a6776f9428bbb2d0959a03d4b24,
title = "The liquid fraction from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw provides lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases with both electrons and H2O2 co-substrate",
abstract = "Background: Enzyme-aided valorization of lignocellulose represents a green and sustainable alternative to the traditional chemical industry. The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are important components of the state-of-the art enzyme cocktails for cellulose conversion. Yet, these monocopper enzymes are poorly characterized in terms of their kinetics, as exemplified by the growing evidence for that H2O2 may be a more efficient co-substrate for LPMOs than O2. LPMOs need external electron donors and one key question of relevance for bioprocess development is whether the required reducing power may be provided by the lignocellulosic substrate. Results: Here, we show that the liquid fraction (LF) resulting from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw supports LPMO activity on both chitin and cellulose. The initial, transient activity burst of the LPMO reaction was caused by the H2O2 present in the LF before addition of LPMO, while the steady-state rate of LPMO reaction was limited by the LPMO-independent production of H2O2 in the LF. H2O2 is an intermediate of LF oxidation as evidenced by a slow H2O2 accumulation in LF, despite high H2O2 production rates. This H2O2 scavenging ability of LF is important since high concentrations of H2O2 may lead to irreversible inactivation of LPMOs. Conclusions: Our results support the growing understanding that fine-tuned control over the rates of H2O2 production and consumption in different, enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions is essential for harnessing the full catalytic potential of LPMOs in lignocellulose valorization.",
keywords = "Cellulose, Chitin, Hydrogen peroxide, Hydrothermal pretreatment, Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase, Oxidation, Phenolic compounds, Serratia marcescens LPMO10A, Trichoderma reesei LPMO9A, Wheat straw",
author = "Riin Kont and Ville Pihlajaniemi and Borisova, {Anna S.} and Nina Aro and Kaisa Marjamaa and Judith Loogen and Jochen B{\"u}chs and Eijsink, {Vincent G.H.} and Kristiina Kruus and Priit V{\"a}ljama{\"e}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1186/s13068-019-1578-5",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Biotechnology for Biofuels",
issn = "1754-6834",
number = "1",

}

The liquid fraction from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw provides lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases with both electrons and H2O2 co-substrate. / Kont, Riin; Pihlajaniemi, Ville; Borisova, Anna S.; Aro, Nina; Marjamaa, Kaisa; Loogen, Judith; Büchs, Jochen; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Kruus, Kristiina; Väljamaë, Priit (Corresponding Author).

In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, Vol. 12, No. 1, 235, 08.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The liquid fraction from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw provides lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases with both electrons and H2O2 co-substrate

AU - Kont, Riin

AU - Pihlajaniemi, Ville

AU - Borisova, Anna S.

AU - Aro, Nina

AU - Marjamaa, Kaisa

AU - Loogen, Judith

AU - Büchs, Jochen

AU - Eijsink, Vincent G.H.

AU - Kruus, Kristiina

AU - Väljamaë, Priit

PY - 2019/10/8

Y1 - 2019/10/8

N2 - Background: Enzyme-aided valorization of lignocellulose represents a green and sustainable alternative to the traditional chemical industry. The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are important components of the state-of-the art enzyme cocktails for cellulose conversion. Yet, these monocopper enzymes are poorly characterized in terms of their kinetics, as exemplified by the growing evidence for that H2O2 may be a more efficient co-substrate for LPMOs than O2. LPMOs need external electron donors and one key question of relevance for bioprocess development is whether the required reducing power may be provided by the lignocellulosic substrate. Results: Here, we show that the liquid fraction (LF) resulting from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw supports LPMO activity on both chitin and cellulose. The initial, transient activity burst of the LPMO reaction was caused by the H2O2 present in the LF before addition of LPMO, while the steady-state rate of LPMO reaction was limited by the LPMO-independent production of H2O2 in the LF. H2O2 is an intermediate of LF oxidation as evidenced by a slow H2O2 accumulation in LF, despite high H2O2 production rates. This H2O2 scavenging ability of LF is important since high concentrations of H2O2 may lead to irreversible inactivation of LPMOs. Conclusions: Our results support the growing understanding that fine-tuned control over the rates of H2O2 production and consumption in different, enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions is essential for harnessing the full catalytic potential of LPMOs in lignocellulose valorization.

AB - Background: Enzyme-aided valorization of lignocellulose represents a green and sustainable alternative to the traditional chemical industry. The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are important components of the state-of-the art enzyme cocktails for cellulose conversion. Yet, these monocopper enzymes are poorly characterized in terms of their kinetics, as exemplified by the growing evidence for that H2O2 may be a more efficient co-substrate for LPMOs than O2. LPMOs need external electron donors and one key question of relevance for bioprocess development is whether the required reducing power may be provided by the lignocellulosic substrate. Results: Here, we show that the liquid fraction (LF) resulting from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw supports LPMO activity on both chitin and cellulose. The initial, transient activity burst of the LPMO reaction was caused by the H2O2 present in the LF before addition of LPMO, while the steady-state rate of LPMO reaction was limited by the LPMO-independent production of H2O2 in the LF. H2O2 is an intermediate of LF oxidation as evidenced by a slow H2O2 accumulation in LF, despite high H2O2 production rates. This H2O2 scavenging ability of LF is important since high concentrations of H2O2 may lead to irreversible inactivation of LPMOs. Conclusions: Our results support the growing understanding that fine-tuned control over the rates of H2O2 production and consumption in different, enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions is essential for harnessing the full catalytic potential of LPMOs in lignocellulose valorization.

KW - Cellulose

KW - Chitin

KW - Hydrogen peroxide

KW - Hydrothermal pretreatment

KW - Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

KW - Oxidation

KW - Phenolic compounds

KW - Serratia marcescens LPMO10A

KW - Trichoderma reesei LPMO9A

KW - Wheat straw

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85073427973&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s13068-019-1578-5

DO - 10.1186/s13068-019-1578-5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85073427973

VL - 12

JO - Biotechnology for Biofuels

JF - Biotechnology for Biofuels

SN - 1754-6834

IS - 1

M1 - 235

ER -