The rhythm of yeast

Peter Richard (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although yeast are unicellular and comparatively simple organisms, they have a sense of time which is not related to reproduction cycles. The glycolytic pathway exhibits oscillatory behaviour, i.e. the metabolite concentrations oscillate around phosphofructokinase. The frequency of these oscillations is about 1 min when using intact cells. Also a yeast cell extract can oscillate, though with a lower frequency. With intact cells the macroscopic oscillations can only be observed when most of the cells oscillate in concert. Transient oscillations can be observed upon simultaneous induction; sustained oscillations require an active synchronisation mechanism. Such an active synchronisation mechanism, which involves acetaldehyde as a signalling compound, operates under certain conditions. How common these oscillations are in the absence of a synchronisation mechanism is an open question. Under aerobic conditions an oscillatory metabolism can also be observed, but with a much lower frequency than the glycolytic oscillations. The frequency is between one and several hours. These oscillations are partly related to the reproductive cycle, i.e. the budding index also oscillates; however, under some conditions they are unrelated to the reproductive cycle, i.e. the budding index is constant. These oscillations also have an active synchronisation mechanism, which involves hydrogen sulfide as a synchronising agent. Oscillations with a frequency of days can be observed with yeast colonies on plates. Here the oscillations have a synchronisation mechanism which uses ammonia as a synchronising agent.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)547-557
Number of pages11
JournalFEMS Microbiology Reviews
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Yeasts
Phosphofructokinases
Hydrogen Sulfide
Acetaldehyde
Cell Extracts
Ammonia
Reproduction

Keywords

  • Oscillation
  • Oscillatory metabolism
  • Synchronisation
  • Signalling
  • Intercellular communication

Cite this

Richard, Peter. / The rhythm of yeast. In: FEMS Microbiology Reviews. 2003 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 547-557.
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The rhythm of yeast. / Richard, Peter (Corresponding Author).

In: FEMS Microbiology Reviews, Vol. 27, No. 4, 2003, p. 547-557.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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