Traditional and modern biotechnology

Annika Wilhelmson, Anu Kaukovirta-Norja, Silja Home

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleProfessional

Abstract

The brewing industry has changed from local, small breweries to global companies and fully automated plants. Our knowledge on biological processes of the barley-to-beer chain and tools to control the process and product quality, benefit from the development of basic sciences and engineering.Beer has been brewed for thousands of years. For a long time beer production was, however, pure cookery. The development of the brewing industry began in the 19th century – largely as a consequence of the development of technology in general. The scientific basis of beer brewing was also laid at that time. Sciences such as biochemistry and microbiology benefited greatly from the early malting and brewing research that was driven by the need to understand biological processes such as germination, mashing and fermentation. Later the term biotechnology was invented meaning industrial application of living cells and combining basic sciences with engineering. Nowadays the definition of biotechnology is even wider and covers the research and development of biological processes on a genetic and molecular level.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24 - 27
Number of pages4
JournalNew Food
Volume8
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2005
MoE publication typeNot Eligible

Fingerprint

brewing industry
biotechnology
biological processes
engineering
biochemistry
microbiology
barley
research and development
fermentation
germination
science

Cite this

Wilhelmson, A., Kaukovirta-Norja, A., & Home, S. (2005). Traditional and modern biotechnology. New Food, 8(2), 24 - 27.
Wilhelmson, Annika ; Kaukovirta-Norja, Anu ; Home, Silja. / Traditional and modern biotechnology. In: New Food. 2005 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 24 - 27.
@article{8233e66f54e34be4b806091ad02ee2e9,
title = "Traditional and modern biotechnology",
abstract = "The brewing industry has changed from local, small breweries to global companies and fully automated plants. Our knowledge on biological processes of the barley-to-beer chain and tools to control the process and product quality, benefit from the development of basic sciences and engineering.Beer has been brewed for thousands of years. For a long time beer production was, however, pure cookery. The development of the brewing industry began in the 19th century – largely as a consequence of the development of technology in general. The scientific basis of beer brewing was also laid at that time. Sciences such as biochemistry and microbiology benefited greatly from the early malting and brewing research that was driven by the need to understand biological processes such as germination, mashing and fermentation. Later the term biotechnology was invented meaning industrial application of living cells and combining basic sciences with engineering. Nowadays the definition of biotechnology is even wider and covers the research and development of biological processes on a genetic and molecular level.",
author = "Annika Wilhelmson and Anu Kaukovirta-Norja and Silja Home",
year = "2005",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "24 -- 27",
journal = "New Food",
issn = "1461-4642",
number = "2",

}

Wilhelmson, A, Kaukovirta-Norja, A & Home, S 2005, 'Traditional and modern biotechnology', New Food, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 24 - 27.

Traditional and modern biotechnology. / Wilhelmson, Annika; Kaukovirta-Norja, Anu; Home, Silja.

In: New Food, Vol. 8, No. 2, 2005, p. 24 - 27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleProfessional

TY - JOUR

T1 - Traditional and modern biotechnology

AU - Wilhelmson, Annika

AU - Kaukovirta-Norja, Anu

AU - Home, Silja

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - The brewing industry has changed from local, small breweries to global companies and fully automated plants. Our knowledge on biological processes of the barley-to-beer chain and tools to control the process and product quality, benefit from the development of basic sciences and engineering.Beer has been brewed for thousands of years. For a long time beer production was, however, pure cookery. The development of the brewing industry began in the 19th century – largely as a consequence of the development of technology in general. The scientific basis of beer brewing was also laid at that time. Sciences such as biochemistry and microbiology benefited greatly from the early malting and brewing research that was driven by the need to understand biological processes such as germination, mashing and fermentation. Later the term biotechnology was invented meaning industrial application of living cells and combining basic sciences with engineering. Nowadays the definition of biotechnology is even wider and covers the research and development of biological processes on a genetic and molecular level.

AB - The brewing industry has changed from local, small breweries to global companies and fully automated plants. Our knowledge on biological processes of the barley-to-beer chain and tools to control the process and product quality, benefit from the development of basic sciences and engineering.Beer has been brewed for thousands of years. For a long time beer production was, however, pure cookery. The development of the brewing industry began in the 19th century – largely as a consequence of the development of technology in general. The scientific basis of beer brewing was also laid at that time. Sciences such as biochemistry and microbiology benefited greatly from the early malting and brewing research that was driven by the need to understand biological processes such as germination, mashing and fermentation. Later the term biotechnology was invented meaning industrial application of living cells and combining basic sciences with engineering. Nowadays the definition of biotechnology is even wider and covers the research and development of biological processes on a genetic and molecular level.

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 24

EP - 27

JO - New Food

JF - New Food

SN - 1461-4642

IS - 2

ER -

Wilhelmson A, Kaukovirta-Norja A, Home S. Traditional and modern biotechnology. New Food. 2005;8(2):24 - 27.