Transformation of diesel engine exhaust in an environmental chamber

Ari P. Leskinen, Jorma Jokiniemi, Kari E. J. Lehtinen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Overnight aging experiments with diesel engine exhaust from a diesel power aggregate, with no or 9 kW load, and from a diesel-fueled vehicle were conducted in an environmental chamber. During a 24 h aging period the volatilities of monodisperse particles at 140, 250 and 360 °C heater temperatures were analyzed with volatility tandem differential mobility analysis (VTDMA).
The particulate organic to total carbon ratio and organic carbon subfractions at 120, 250, 450 and 550 °C were analyzed with thermal-optical carbon analysis for samples from fresh, 8 or 18 h aged and 24 h aged aerosol.
During the experiment also the particle size distribution, ozone and nitrogen oxide concentration, and temperature, relative humidity and total solar and total ultraviolet radiation in the chamber were monitored.

After injection, the geometric mean diameter and number concentration of the particles in the chamber were 66–85 nm and 0.9–4.6×105 cm−3, respectively. The particles were seen to grow fast, at a growth rate of 18–47 nm h−1 during the first hour. The fresh particles from the diesel power aggregate contained 37–45% of apparent volume semi-volatile compounds with no load and 10–24% with 9 kW load.
The semi-volatile apparent volume fraction at 360 °C for 50 nm particles produced by the diesel power aggregate was 57%. After 24 h of aging, the semi-volatile apparent volume fraction at 360 °C for 100 nm particles was 99%.
This suggests that the particles in the 24 h aged aerosol at this size class are no more primary particles but particles that are formed in the chamber through nucleation and subsequent growth.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8865-8873
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume41
Issue number39
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

diesel engine
diesel
aerosol
particle
carbon
ultraviolet radiation
nitrogen oxides
nucleation
relative humidity
experiment
temperature
organic carbon
ozone
particle size

Keywords

  • aerosol
  • diesel engine exhaust
  • aging
  • environmental chamber
  • tandem differential mobility analyzer

Cite this

Leskinen, Ari P. ; Jokiniemi, Jorma ; Lehtinen, Kari E. J. / Transformation of diesel engine exhaust in an environmental chamber. In: Atmospheric Environment. 2007 ; Vol. 41, No. 39. pp. 8865-8873.
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abstract = "Overnight aging experiments with diesel engine exhaust from a diesel power aggregate, with no or 9 kW load, and from a diesel-fueled vehicle were conducted in an environmental chamber. During a 24 h aging period the volatilities of monodisperse particles at 140, 250 and 360 °C heater temperatures were analyzed with volatility tandem differential mobility analysis (VTDMA). The particulate organic to total carbon ratio and organic carbon subfractions at 120, 250, 450 and 550 °C were analyzed with thermal-optical carbon analysis for samples from fresh, 8 or 18 h aged and 24 h aged aerosol. During the experiment also the particle size distribution, ozone and nitrogen oxide concentration, and temperature, relative humidity and total solar and total ultraviolet radiation in the chamber were monitored.After injection, the geometric mean diameter and number concentration of the particles in the chamber were 66–85 nm and 0.9–4.6×105 cm−3, respectively. The particles were seen to grow fast, at a growth rate of 18–47 nm h−1 during the first hour. The fresh particles from the diesel power aggregate contained 37–45{\%} of apparent volume semi-volatile compounds with no load and 10–24{\%} with 9 kW load. The semi-volatile apparent volume fraction at 360 °C for 50 nm particles produced by the diesel power aggregate was 57{\%}. After 24 h of aging, the semi-volatile apparent volume fraction at 360 °C for 100 nm particles was 99{\%}. This suggests that the particles in the 24 h aged aerosol at this size class are no more primary particles but particles that are formed in the chamber through nucleation and subsequent growth.",
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author = "Leskinen, {Ari P.} and Jorma Jokiniemi and Lehtinen, {Kari E. J.}",
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Transformation of diesel engine exhaust in an environmental chamber. / Leskinen, Ari P.; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 41, No. 39, 2007, p. 8865-8873.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transformation of diesel engine exhaust in an environmental chamber

AU - Leskinen, Ari P.

AU - Jokiniemi, Jorma

AU - Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

PY - 2007

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N2 - Overnight aging experiments with diesel engine exhaust from a diesel power aggregate, with no or 9 kW load, and from a diesel-fueled vehicle were conducted in an environmental chamber. During a 24 h aging period the volatilities of monodisperse particles at 140, 250 and 360 °C heater temperatures were analyzed with volatility tandem differential mobility analysis (VTDMA). The particulate organic to total carbon ratio and organic carbon subfractions at 120, 250, 450 and 550 °C were analyzed with thermal-optical carbon analysis for samples from fresh, 8 or 18 h aged and 24 h aged aerosol. During the experiment also the particle size distribution, ozone and nitrogen oxide concentration, and temperature, relative humidity and total solar and total ultraviolet radiation in the chamber were monitored.After injection, the geometric mean diameter and number concentration of the particles in the chamber were 66–85 nm and 0.9–4.6×105 cm−3, respectively. The particles were seen to grow fast, at a growth rate of 18–47 nm h−1 during the first hour. The fresh particles from the diesel power aggregate contained 37–45% of apparent volume semi-volatile compounds with no load and 10–24% with 9 kW load. The semi-volatile apparent volume fraction at 360 °C for 50 nm particles produced by the diesel power aggregate was 57%. After 24 h of aging, the semi-volatile apparent volume fraction at 360 °C for 100 nm particles was 99%. This suggests that the particles in the 24 h aged aerosol at this size class are no more primary particles but particles that are formed in the chamber through nucleation and subsequent growth.

AB - Overnight aging experiments with diesel engine exhaust from a diesel power aggregate, with no or 9 kW load, and from a diesel-fueled vehicle were conducted in an environmental chamber. During a 24 h aging period the volatilities of monodisperse particles at 140, 250 and 360 °C heater temperatures were analyzed with volatility tandem differential mobility analysis (VTDMA). The particulate organic to total carbon ratio and organic carbon subfractions at 120, 250, 450 and 550 °C were analyzed with thermal-optical carbon analysis for samples from fresh, 8 or 18 h aged and 24 h aged aerosol. During the experiment also the particle size distribution, ozone and nitrogen oxide concentration, and temperature, relative humidity and total solar and total ultraviolet radiation in the chamber were monitored.After injection, the geometric mean diameter and number concentration of the particles in the chamber were 66–85 nm and 0.9–4.6×105 cm−3, respectively. The particles were seen to grow fast, at a growth rate of 18–47 nm h−1 during the first hour. The fresh particles from the diesel power aggregate contained 37–45% of apparent volume semi-volatile compounds with no load and 10–24% with 9 kW load. The semi-volatile apparent volume fraction at 360 °C for 50 nm particles produced by the diesel power aggregate was 57%. After 24 h of aging, the semi-volatile apparent volume fraction at 360 °C for 100 nm particles was 99%. This suggests that the particles in the 24 h aged aerosol at this size class are no more primary particles but particles that are formed in the chamber through nucleation and subsequent growth.

KW - aerosol

KW - diesel engine exhaust

KW - aging

KW - environmental chamber

KW - tandem differential mobility analyzer

U2 - 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.08.021

DO - 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.08.021

M3 - Article

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SP - 8865

EP - 8873

JO - Atmospheric Environment

JF - Atmospheric Environment

SN - 1352-2310

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ER -