Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area

Karri Saarnio, Jarkko V. Niemi, Sanna Saarikoski, Minna Aurela, Hilkka Timonen, Kimmo Teinilä, Maria Myllynen, Anna Frey, Heikki Lamberg, Jorma Jokiniemi, Risto Hillamo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The spatiotemporal variation of ambient particles under the influence of biomass burning emissions was studied in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA) in selected periods during 2005-2009. Monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs; levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan), commonly known biomass burning tracers, were used to estimate the wood combustion contribution to local particulate matter (PM) concentration levels at three urban background sites close to the city centre, and at three suburban sites influenced by local small-scale wood combustion. In the cold season (October-March), the mean MAs concentrations were 115-225 ng m -3 and 83-98 ng m -3 at the suburban and urban sites, respectively. In the warm season, the mean MAs concentrations were low (19-78 ng m -3), excluding open land fire smoke episodes (222-378 ng m -3). Regionally distributed wood combustion particles raised the levels over the whole HMA while particles from local wood combustion sources raised the level at suburban sites only. The estimated average contribution of wood combustion to fine particles (PM2.5) ranged from 18% to 29% at the urban sites and from 31% to 66% at the suburban sites in the cold season. The PM measurements from ambient air and combustion experiments showed that the proportions of the three MAs can be utilised to separate the wildfire particles from residential wood combustion particles.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-183
JournalBoreal Environment Research
Volume17
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 2012
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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monosaccharide
anhydrides
Monosaccharides
Anhydrides
monosaccharides
combustion
metropolitan area
Wood
Particulate Matter
cold season
urban site
Biomass
biomass burning
particulate matter
particulates
Smoke
biomass
warm season
smoke
wildfires

Cite this

Saarnio, K., Niemi, J. V., Saarikoski, S., Aurela, M., Timonen, H., Teinilä, K., ... Hillamo, R. (2012). Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area. Boreal Environment Research, 17(3-4), 163-183.
Saarnio, Karri ; Niemi, Jarkko V. ; Saarikoski, Sanna ; Aurela, Minna ; Timonen, Hilkka ; Teinilä, Kimmo ; Myllynen, Maria ; Frey, Anna ; Lamberg, Heikki ; Jokiniemi, Jorma ; Hillamo, Risto. / Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area. In: Boreal Environment Research. 2012 ; Vol. 17, No. 3-4. pp. 163-183.
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title = "Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area",
abstract = "The spatiotemporal variation of ambient particles under the influence of biomass burning emissions was studied in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA) in selected periods during 2005-2009. Monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs; levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan), commonly known biomass burning tracers, were used to estimate the wood combustion contribution to local particulate matter (PM) concentration levels at three urban background sites close to the city centre, and at three suburban sites influenced by local small-scale wood combustion. In the cold season (October-March), the mean MAs concentrations were 115-225 ng m -3 and 83-98 ng m -3 at the suburban and urban sites, respectively. In the warm season, the mean MAs concentrations were low (19-78 ng m -3), excluding open land fire smoke episodes (222-378 ng m -3). Regionally distributed wood combustion particles raised the levels over the whole HMA while particles from local wood combustion sources raised the level at suburban sites only. The estimated average contribution of wood combustion to fine particles (PM2.5) ranged from 18{\%} to 29{\%} at the urban sites and from 31{\%} to 66{\%} at the suburban sites in the cold season. The PM measurements from ambient air and combustion experiments showed that the proportions of the three MAs can be utilised to separate the wildfire particles from residential wood combustion particles.",
author = "Karri Saarnio and Niemi, {Jarkko V.} and Sanna Saarikoski and Minna Aurela and Hilkka Timonen and Kimmo Teinil{\"a} and Maria Myllynen and Anna Frey and Heikki Lamberg and Jorma Jokiniemi and Risto Hillamo",
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Saarnio, K, Niemi, JV, Saarikoski, S, Aurela, M, Timonen, H, Teinilä, K, Myllynen, M, Frey, A, Lamberg, H, Jokiniemi, J & Hillamo, R 2012, 'Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area', Boreal Environment Research, vol. 17, no. 3-4, pp. 163-183.

Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area. / Saarnio, Karri; Niemi, Jarkko V.; Saarikoski, Sanna; Aurela, Minna; Timonen, Hilkka; Teinilä, Kimmo; Myllynen, Maria; Frey, Anna; Lamberg, Heikki; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hillamo, Risto.

In: Boreal Environment Research, Vol. 17, No. 3-4, 2012, p. 163-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area

AU - Saarnio, Karri

AU - Niemi, Jarkko V.

AU - Saarikoski, Sanna

AU - Aurela, Minna

AU - Timonen, Hilkka

AU - Teinilä, Kimmo

AU - Myllynen, Maria

AU - Frey, Anna

AU - Lamberg, Heikki

AU - Jokiniemi, Jorma

AU - Hillamo, Risto

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The spatiotemporal variation of ambient particles under the influence of biomass burning emissions was studied in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA) in selected periods during 2005-2009. Monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs; levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan), commonly known biomass burning tracers, were used to estimate the wood combustion contribution to local particulate matter (PM) concentration levels at three urban background sites close to the city centre, and at three suburban sites influenced by local small-scale wood combustion. In the cold season (October-March), the mean MAs concentrations were 115-225 ng m -3 and 83-98 ng m -3 at the suburban and urban sites, respectively. In the warm season, the mean MAs concentrations were low (19-78 ng m -3), excluding open land fire smoke episodes (222-378 ng m -3). Regionally distributed wood combustion particles raised the levels over the whole HMA while particles from local wood combustion sources raised the level at suburban sites only. The estimated average contribution of wood combustion to fine particles (PM2.5) ranged from 18% to 29% at the urban sites and from 31% to 66% at the suburban sites in the cold season. The PM measurements from ambient air and combustion experiments showed that the proportions of the three MAs can be utilised to separate the wildfire particles from residential wood combustion particles.

AB - The spatiotemporal variation of ambient particles under the influence of biomass burning emissions was studied in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA) in selected periods during 2005-2009. Monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs; levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan), commonly known biomass burning tracers, were used to estimate the wood combustion contribution to local particulate matter (PM) concentration levels at three urban background sites close to the city centre, and at three suburban sites influenced by local small-scale wood combustion. In the cold season (October-March), the mean MAs concentrations were 115-225 ng m -3 and 83-98 ng m -3 at the suburban and urban sites, respectively. In the warm season, the mean MAs concentrations were low (19-78 ng m -3), excluding open land fire smoke episodes (222-378 ng m -3). Regionally distributed wood combustion particles raised the levels over the whole HMA while particles from local wood combustion sources raised the level at suburban sites only. The estimated average contribution of wood combustion to fine particles (PM2.5) ranged from 18% to 29% at the urban sites and from 31% to 66% at the suburban sites in the cold season. The PM measurements from ambient air and combustion experiments showed that the proportions of the three MAs can be utilised to separate the wildfire particles from residential wood combustion particles.

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 163

EP - 183

JO - Boreal Environment Research

JF - Boreal Environment Research

SN - 1239-6095

IS - 3-4

ER -