Wear models

Kenneth Holmberg, Anssi Laukkanen

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter or book articleProfessional

    Abstract

    Wear is commonly defined as the removal of material from solid surfaces as a result of one contacting surface moving over another. The material is removed in the form of wear debris. The typical size of wear debris in visible wear conditions is from about half a micrometer to tens or hundreds of micrometers. In severe mining wear conditions, single wear particles can be of centimeter size. In steady-state low-wear-lubricated conditions in an engine, the size of wear particles in continuous wear may be of nanometer size.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationHandbook of Lubrication and Tribology
    Subtitle of host publicationTheory and Design
    EditorsRobert W. Bruce
    PublisherCRC Press
    Pages1-21
    VolumeII
    EditionSecond
    ISBN (Electronic)978-042913737-2
    ISBN (Print)978-142006908-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    MoE publication typeD2 Article in professional manuals or guides or professional information systems or text book material

    Fingerprint

    Wear of materials
    Debris
    Engines

    Keywords

    • ProperTune

    Cite this

    Holmberg, K., & Laukkanen, A. (2012). Wear models. In R. W. Bruce (Ed.), Handbook of Lubrication and Tribology: Theory and Design (Second ed., Vol. II, pp. 1-21). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b12265
    Holmberg, Kenneth ; Laukkanen, Anssi. / Wear models. Handbook of Lubrication and Tribology: Theory and Design. editor / Robert W. Bruce. Vol. II Second. ed. CRC Press, 2012. pp. 1-21
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    Holmberg, K & Laukkanen, A 2012, Wear models. in RW Bruce (ed.), Handbook of Lubrication and Tribology: Theory and Design. Second edn, vol. II, CRC Press, pp. 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1201/b12265

    Wear models. / Holmberg, Kenneth; Laukkanen, Anssi.

    Handbook of Lubrication and Tribology: Theory and Design. ed. / Robert W. Bruce. Vol. II Second. ed. CRC Press, 2012. p. 1-21.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter or book articleProfessional

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    Holmberg K, Laukkanen A. Wear models. In Bruce RW, editor, Handbook of Lubrication and Tribology: Theory and Design. Second ed. Vol. II. CRC Press. 2012. p. 1-21 https://doi.org/10.1201/b12265